Magnetic field at the center of a loop

  • #1
7
0

Homework Statement


upload_2015-2-19_11-57-30.png

A conductor consists of a circular loop of radius
R = 14.4 cm
and two long, straight sections as shown in the figure. The wire lies in the plane of the paper and carries a current
I = 1.60 A.
Find the magnetic field at the center of the loop.

Homework Equations


biot-savart law
?

The Attempt at a Solution


I know I need use biot-savart law to get the field created by the loop, which is giving me 8.77 uT. This is apparently within 10% of the correct answer.
Do i need to find the current from the straight part of the wire too (superposition)?

I'm just not sure how to do this / what equations to use to do this?
 

Attachments

Answers and Replies

  • #2
gneill
Mentor
20,875
2,838

Homework Statement


View attachment 79319
A conductor consists of a circular loop of radius
R = 14.4 cm
and two long, straight sections as shown in the figure. The wire lies in the plane of the paper and carries a current
I = 1.60 A.
Find the magnetic field at the center of the loop.

Homework Equations


biot-savart law
?

The Attempt at a Solution


I know I need use biot-savart law to get the field created by the loop, which is giving me 8.77 uT. This is apparently within 10% of the correct answer.
Do i need to find the current from the straight part of the wire too (superposition)?
Yes. And superpostiion is an excellent idea.
I'm just not sure how to do this / what equations to use to do this?
You should have an expression for the magnetic field at a given distance from a current-carrying wire...
 
  • #3
7
0
thats where i'm confused.

shouldn't i use B = (uI)/(2 pi r) ?
4pi x 10^-7 x 1.6A / 2 pi x .144m ? this gives me 2.22 uT which when added to the 8.77 is out the the correct range
 
Last edited:
  • #4
gneill
Mentor
20,875
2,838
thats where i'm confused.

shouldn't i use B = (uI)/(2 pi r) ?
4pi x 10^-7 x 1.6A / 2 pi x .144m ? this gives me 2.22 uT which when added to the 8.77 is out the the correct range
2.22 μT looks right for the straight wire. But the loop contribution looks a bit high to me. Can you show the details of your work there?
i need to take this integral of this dont i?
No, the expression gives the field magnitude, not a differential element. The integration was already done in deriving the expression.
 
  • #5
7
0
Ahhhh thank you! my mistake was in the calculation for the loop! i left the 4pi in place when using u/4pi

hahaah that was dumb. but thank you, i got the right answer. it's 9.20 uT!

:)
 

Related Threads on Magnetic field at the center of a loop

Replies
4
Views
13K
  • Last Post
Replies
9
Views
27K
  • Last Post
Replies
7
Views
2K
Replies
10
Views
47K
Replies
1
Views
1K
Replies
6
Views
4K
Replies
7
Views
9K
Replies
3
Views
10K
Replies
12
Views
1K
Replies
2
Views
3K
Top