Magnetic field at the center of a solenoid?

In summary, a student needs to make a solenoid with a magnetic field of 1.09 T at its center. The solenoid will consist of a wire wrapped around a solid iron cylinder with a relative permeability of 1400, a length of 13.3 cm, and a radius of 1.92 cm. The wire can carry a maximum current of 1.15 A. To find the number of turns needed to produce the desired magnetic field, an expression for the magnetic field at the center of the solenoid can be derived using the current, length, radius, permeability, and number of turns. This can be solved for the number of turns and then substituted with the given values. Amp
  • #1
tabitha2232
1
0
A studetn needs to make a solenoid that produses 1.09 T at its center. a wire will be wrapped around a solid cylinder of iron with a relative permeability Km of 1400, a length of 13.3 cm and a radius of 1.92 cm. if the wire can carry a max current of 1.15 A how many turns of wire are neede to produce the desired B field?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Can you try to find an expression for the magnetic field at the center of a solenoid?
(I think you cannot use Ampere's law here (since the length is only 13.3cm, if you use Ampere's law you assume the length is nearly infinite).)

The expression for B will be in terms of the current, the length, the radius, the permeability and the number of turns. Solve for the number of turns, and you can plug in your values.
 
  • #3
(I can't edit my post anymore..?)

Do you know Ampere's law?
Do you know Biot-Savart's law?
Do you know which one you must use here?

You could use Ampere's law, which makes the calculation lots easier, but it will also be much more of an approximation.
If you use Biot-Savart's law the magnetic field is more exact. I don't know how much the answer will vary depending on which method you use, it could well be that it is the same (since you will also have to round it to an integer, having 31.53 coils for example doesn't make sense..)
 

1. What is a solenoid?

A solenoid is a coil of wire that produces a magnetic field when an electric current flows through it. It is typically cylindrical in shape and has a uniform cross-section.

2. How is the magnetic field at the center of a solenoid calculated?

The magnetic field at the center of a solenoid can be calculated using the equation B = μ₀nI, where B is the magnetic field strength, μ₀ is the permeability of free space, n is the number of turns per unit length of the solenoid, and I is the current flowing through the solenoid.

3. Does the magnetic field at the center of a solenoid depend on the length of the solenoid?

No, the magnetic field at the center of a solenoid is independent of the length of the solenoid. It only depends on the number of turns per unit length and the current flowing through the solenoid.

4. How can the magnetic field at the center of a solenoid be increased?

The magnetic field at the center of a solenoid can be increased by increasing the number of turns per unit length or by increasing the current flowing through the solenoid. Additionally, using a material with a higher permeability can also increase the magnetic field strength.

5. What is the direction of the magnetic field at the center of a solenoid?

The magnetic field at the center of a solenoid is parallel to the axis of the solenoid and has a direction determined by the right-hand rule. This means that if you point your right thumb in the direction of the current flow, your fingers will curl in the direction of the magnetic field lines.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
700
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
21
Views
5K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
722
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
23
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
8
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
11
Views
2K
Back
Top