Margules' 3 suffix equations for binary solution derivation

In summary, Margules' 3 suffix equations are used to calculate the excess Gibbs free energy of a binary solution and are named after scientist Richard Zsigmondy Margules. They differ from other equations by considering both enthalpy and entropy changes. The main assumptions are that the solution is ideal and that the interactions between different components are the same in both liquid and vapor phases. They can be derived from thermodynamic principles and have practical applications in the chemical industry, geology, and environmental science.
  • #1
Indicate briefly how the Margules' 3 suffix equations are derived for a binary solution.

ln gamma1 = [A12 + (B12 - A12)x1](x2)^2

ln gamma2 = [B12 + (A12 - B12)x2](x1)^2

Any idea how this would be shown.. :S
 
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  • #2
You have the model for the excess gibbs energy, right? You can calculate the activity coefficient from the excess free energy model by differentiating wrt to the no of moles of component i, keeping the Temp, pressure constant.

For example, look at this thread
 
  • #3


The Margules' 3 suffix equations are a set of equations used to describe the activity coefficients (ln gamma) of a binary solution. These equations were developed by the German chemist Richard Wilhelm Heinrich Margules in the late 19th century. They are derived from the Gibbs-Duhem equation, which relates the partial molar properties of a solution.

To derive the Margules' 3 suffix equations, we start with the expression for the excess Gibbs free energy (Gex) of a binary solution:

Gex = x1x2(A12x1 + B12x2)

Where x1 and x2 are the mole fractions of the two components, and A12 and B12 are the Margules' parameters. This equation assumes that the solution follows Raoult's law, which states that the partial pressure of a component in a solution is equal to its mole fraction multiplied by its vapor pressure in the pure state.

Using the Gibbs-Duhem equation, we can express the excess Gibbs free energy in terms of the activity coefficients (ln gamma):

Gex = RT(x1ln gamma1 + x2ln gamma2)

Equating the two expressions for Gex and rearranging, we get:

ln gamma1 = (A12x1 + B12x2)/x1RT

ln gamma2 = (A12x1 + B12x2)/x2RT

Substituting for x1 and x2 in the above equations, we get the Margules' 3 suffix equations:

ln gamma1 = [A12 + (B12 - A12)x1](x2)^2

ln gamma2 = [B12 + (A12 - B12)x2](x1)^2

These equations show that the activity coefficients of the two components are dependent on both the mole fractions and the Margules' parameters. They are useful in predicting the behavior of binary solutions and can be used to calculate values such as boiling points, vapor pressures, and solubility.

In summary, the Margules' 3 suffix equations are derived from the Gibbs-Duhem equation and are used to describe the activity coefficients of a binary solution. They are important tools in understanding the properties of solutions and have been widely used in various fields of chemistry and engineering.
 

1. What are Margules' 3 suffix equations for binary solution derivation?

Margules' 3 suffix equations are mathematical equations used to calculate the excess Gibbs free energy of a binary solution. They are named after the scientist Richard Zsigmondy Margules, who developed them in the early 20th century. The equations take into account the interactions between the molecules of the two components in a solution.

2. How do Margules' 3 suffix equations differ from other equations used for binary solution derivation?

Margules' 3 suffix equations are unique in that they take into account both the enthalpy and entropy changes in a solution, while other equations may only consider one or the other. This makes them more accurate and applicable to a wider range of solutions.

3. What are the assumptions made in Margules' 3 suffix equations?

The main assumptions made in Margules' 3 suffix equations are that the solution is ideal, meaning there are no interactions between the molecules of the same component, and that the interactions between the molecules of different components are the same in both the liquid and vapor phases.

4. How are Margules' 3 suffix equations derived?

Margules' 3 suffix equations are derived using thermodynamic principles and equations, such as the Gibbs-Duhem equation and Raoult's law. They can also be derived from the Redlich-Kister equation, which is a more general equation for excess Gibbs free energy.

5. What are the practical applications of Margules' 3 suffix equations?

Margules' 3 suffix equations are commonly used in the chemical industry to predict the behavior of binary solutions, such as mixtures of solvents, liquid-liquid extraction processes, and polymer solutions. They are also used in geology and environmental science to study the interactions between different components in natural solutions, such as seawater.

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