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Stargazing Mars' orbital telescope and ice rock

  1. Jun 8, 2010 #1

    cph

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    Might one place a telescope in Mars orbit, in order to obtain 6" to 1 ft resolution, looking for closeup geological views; such as mars' stromatolytic fossils, or mars' ice (rock) on the surface, in form of a smooth surface that seems a bit odd? Might billions year old Mars' ice be opaque to light, and take on the appearance of rock, but very light weight rock? So is there mars' ice rock on the surface? Do any of the Mars meteroites on earth have in part mars rock ice?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 9, 2010 #2
  4. Aug 8, 2010 #3

    cph

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    As noted 2 mm resolution (that of a field geologist) would be better. Also placing a Moon orbiter (rover-like) with a telescope, looking for Moon rock ice etc. For example, what appears to be a rock effacement, might continue into mottled appearance for near to reflected light. Thus a geological data base at 2mm resolution also for the Moon; equivalent to placing a geologist on the Moon.
     
  5. Aug 10, 2010 #4

    cph

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    Likewise one could put such rover orbiter, with 2mm resolution, for earth. Thus allowing for exploration of remote areas, such as east of Ural mts. Also perhaps useful for anthropological exploration for fossils in remote fields.
     
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