News Massive Fire at Notre Dame cathedral

russ_watters

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I would not have expected it to be very flammable - perhaps just the roof?
 
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What a pity. I've walked past that cathedral many times (and also been inside). It is located right in the heart of Paris.
 

Ryan_m_b

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I would not have expected it to be very flammable - perhaps just the roof?
Much of the interior of the cathedral, particularly the bell tower, is full of wood. A lot of it intricate carved and centuries old.

I'm hearbroken watching the news. I've been to Notre Dame a couple of times and it's a beautiful building. All the artwork, carvings, the relics, the tower will all be gone. I hope they're able to limit the fire and save the stain glass, but there have been people on the news just now estimating that there might not be anything more than the stone towers left by the time it is out.

Terrible news.
 

Klystron

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Lead was used extensively in constructing cathedrals due in part to its low melting point.
 
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Lead was used extensively in constructing cathedrals due in part to its low melting point.
According to the Paris Fire Brigade, Brigade de sapeurs-pompiers de Paris, an ongoing renovation project, involving many tons of lead, may have contributed to the incendiation.

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All that scaffolding around the apparent heart of the fire, along with the report of ongoing lead-working, much of which, presumably, involves direct flame application, to me strongly suggests that some activity associated with the renovation project may have incipiated the catastrophe.
 

DrClaude

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I passed it countless times when I lived in Paris. Seeing it burn is unbearable. :cry:
 
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I passed it countless times when I lived in Paris. Seeing it burn is unbearable. :cry:
La cathédrale de Notre-Dame ne s'effondrera pas à cause de cette calamité; ses volant-arcs-boutants la soutiendront pour tous nos jours.

The Cathedral of Notre Dame will not collapse due to this calamity; its flying-arch-buttresses will support it for all our days.
 
I hope the hunchback made it out OK.

Cheers
 

russ_watters

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Much of the interior of the cathedral, particularly the bell tower, is full of wood. A lot of it intricate carved and centuries old.
Yeah, I guess I had forgotten how much woodwork was in the interior/base. But at the same time, my understanding is that the roof is not structural and it looks to me like the ceiling is entirely masonary. So I wonder if it is possible for the roof to burn and fall off without touching the interior?.....though the spire collapsing into it doesn't help, and if it did collapse the ceiling arches it could be structurally catastrophic.

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783901-notre-dame-de-paris-interior-ceiling-arches.jpg
 

dlgoff

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I've never been there but when seeing TV news video of the fire, tears well up in my eyes. :oldcry:
 
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I always wanted to visit it once I could afford it, I guess I never will
 
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The Cathedral of Notre Dame will not collapse due to this calamity; its flying-arch-buttresses will support it for all our days.
Support?
The vault was in lateral compression - what is left of the vault still is. The flying arches resist the outwards pressure of the vaults - meaning they meet it with corresponding inwards force.
Had more of the main vault collapsed, would the lateral pressure of the flying buttresses have pushed the side walls over inwards?
 
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Support?
The vault was in lateral compression - what is left of the vault still is. The flying arches resist the outwards pressure of the vaults - meaning they meet it with corresponding inwards force.
Had more of the main vault collapsed, would the lateral pressure of the flying buttresses have pushed the side walls over inwards?
The comparatively lightweight arches transmit the outward pressure from the walls to the comparatively heavyweight piers on the ground. The arches lean against the walls, but they don't themselves have such mass as to collapse the walls inward, even when the walls are not pressing outward, the hypothetical absence of outward pressure being due to hypothetical absence of the vault. In vaulted cathedral architecture, buttresses allow the walls to be made less massive, but even buttressed walls are more massive than the flying arches are. The piers support against the pressure transmitted to them by the arches, but the piers don't themselves exert shear force against the walls.
 
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OmCheeto

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A lot of good things in this article:


Macron: “We Will Rebuild Notre-Dame”
Already, hundreds of millions of euros have been pledged to the [rebuilding] project

“According to a Notre Dame priest during the fire,” reports the Washington Post, “all of the art work had been removed,” much of it taken for restoration at the Louvre before the fire. “French Minister of Culture Franck Riester later clarified that religious relics had been saved and some of the art work inside had suffered smoke damage and was also being taken to the Louvre.”

Remarkably, says the Post, the famous South Rose stained-glass windows, created more than 750 years ago, appear to have survived undamaged.​

I knew almost nothing about Notre Dame before yesterday.
Things I learned:

It's in Paris [I've never been to France]
It's old: 850th anniversary: 2013
Some of the stained glass windows are bigger than the footprint of my house: 130m2 vs 84 m2
The spire was a very recent addition: installed 1844
The interior probably would have left me speechless:

link
"Ava Maria" is a song:

link
 
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The comparatively lightweight arches transmit the outward pressure from the walls to the comparatively heavyweight piers on the ground. The arches lean against the walls, but they don't themselves have such mass as to collapse the walls inward, even when the walls are not pressing outward, the hypothetical absence of outward pressure being due to hypothetical absence of the vault. In vaulted cathedral architecture, buttresses allow the walls to be made less massive, but even buttressed walls are more massive than the flying arches are. The piers support against the pressure transmitted to them by the arches, but the piers don't themselves exert shear force against the walls.
According to BBC News this morning (Radio 4) the inward pressure of the flying buttresses is a significant concern to the structural engineers and is one of the first aspects of reconstruction that will be considered.
 

DrClaude

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According to BBC News this morning (Radio 4) the inward pressure of the flying buttresses is a significant concern to the structural engineers and is one of the first aspects of reconstruction that will be considered.
Yes there is some inward pressure inwards, but, my take on it, is that if the wall masonry has been weakened so much over the years either due to neglect, weathering, and/or from the fire that it is in such a condition that it will topple over from the flying buttress, the wall is probably not worth saving, and should be destroyed and rebuilt if that the option of choice, now that national pride and heritage is of interest.

https://www.thisisinsider.com/notre-dame-was-crumbling-be
I feel for the old lady, and people of Paris/France for this tragedy.
 

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