Master's degree in engineering: is it worth it?

In summary, a Master's degree in any engineering field will give you a significant advantage in the job market, but it varies depending on the discipline. It is also important to consider your interests when deciding to get a Master's.
  • #1
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will a master's degree in any engineering field really give you a significant advantasge in the job market?

does it vary for different disciplines of engineering?
thanks
 
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  • #2
Well in Civil Engineering most people just stay with their Bachelor's, althought in the near future having a Master is going to be the norm, so i say go ahead and get one, too.
 
  • #3
Master's degrees are often prerequisites for some of the most interesting kinds of engineering jobs. On the other hand, you can find employment just fine with only a bachelor's.

- Warren
 
  • #4
chroot said:
Master's degrees are often prerequisites for some of the most interesting kinds of engineering jobs. On the other hand, you can find employment just fine with only a bachelor's.

- Warren

what kind of jobs would be the more interesting jobs?
Like, for cheme or ee, what would be some of the jobs exclusive to those with a masters?
thanks
 
  • #5
Well, as a design engineer, you might need a master's to get real consideration for jobs involving mission critical applications like life support (implantable medical devices), space exploration, etc.

- Warren
 
  • #6
just curious if there is a big difference in salary of bs and masters
 
  • #7
Yep. Usually it's about a 20% difference.

- Warren
 
  • #8
Note, 20% in exchange for 2 years (200%) means 10 years to make up the difference. At which point you have 10 years experience as an engineer which will decrease the margin. Round that down a bit for whatever you're making in grad school...it's really just an estimate anyway.

So the best reason to do it is because of your interests, not money.
 
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  • #9
20% is not a big enough difference to justify it monetarily. It's nothing like the difference between a BSEE and JD (100-200%).

Do it if it interests you, but I don't know of too many of my friends going on to get their masters for the income bump.
 
  • #10
From my understanding, a Master's in CivE goes further than a master's in another engineering discipline.
 
  • #11
Sure, if you want to do civil engineering. It's probably not so helpful if you want to play with electronics.
 
  • #12
huckmank said:
20% is not a big enough difference to justify it monetarily. It's nothing like the difference between a BSEE and JD (100-200%).

Do it if it interests you, but I don't know of too many of my friends going on to get their masters for the income bump.

What is a BSEE and JD?
 
  • #13
Engineering Bachelor's & Law Degree

The research the latter gets you into isn't exactly what I had in mind when I signed up for this ride.
 

1. Is a master's degree in engineering worth the investment?

The value of a master's degree in engineering can vary depending on your career goals and personal circumstances. However, in general, a master's degree can lead to higher salaries, increased job opportunities, and a deeper understanding of your field. It is important to weigh the cost of the degree against the potential benefits for your specific situation.

2. What are the potential career opportunities with a master's degree in engineering?

A master's degree in engineering can open up a variety of career opportunities, including research and development, management, consulting, and teaching positions. It can also provide a pathway for further specialization in a specific area of engineering.

3. How long does it take to complete a master's degree in engineering?

The length of a master's program in engineering can vary, but it typically takes 1-2 years to complete. This can depend on factors such as the specific program, your course load, and any required thesis or research project.

4. Can I pursue a master's degree in engineering if my undergraduate degree is in a different field?

Yes, it is possible to pursue a master's degree in engineering with an undergraduate degree in a different field. However, you may be required to take prerequisite courses to catch up on any foundational knowledge in engineering. It is important to research the specific program's requirements and speak with an advisor to determine the best path for you.

5. Are there online options for a master's degree in engineering?

Yes, there are many online options for a master's degree in engineering. These programs can offer flexibility for those who are working or have other commitments. However, it is important to ensure that the program is accredited and meets your educational and career goals.

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