1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Math guidance for aspiring physicists/mathematicians

  1. Oct 18, 2014 #1
    Hi,

    I found this website particularly useful for enriching my sophomore physics coursework and looking up some topics that are beyond scope of undergrad physics core:

    http://www.staff.science.uu.nl/~Gadda001/goodtheorist/gr.html

    I wonder if there is anything like this for math? It's my second favorite field of study and I would like to be able to look up some more interesting concepts in sources more reliable and broad than wikipedia and faster than shuffling through all math books possible which as a sophomore I don't have many anyway.

    Also, I was wondering if fluid mechanics/hydrodynamics is more of a field of study of math or physics? None department at my school offers any BS/MS courses in it and I have not heard much about it except when it was mentioned a few times in ODE/PDE/waves courses. What would be good books to learn about this field more?

    Lastly, is this a good book to learn more about theory of functions or can you recommend anything better?

    https://www.amazon.com/Functional-A...s=functional+analysis+riesz#reader_0486662896

    Thanks
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 18, 2014 #2

    SteamKing

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Fluid mechanics/hydrodynamics is often incorporated into other courses of study, like aerospace engineering or naval architecture. Schools which offer programs in aerospace engineering or ocean engineering offer courses in these fields, some of which are required for undergraduates, but probably more often for students enrolled in graduate study. Whether the FM/HM courses wind up in the Math department or the Physics department depends more on the organization of academics at a particular university. You should find plenty of courses offered in these subjects at universities like MIT, U. of Michigan, and the U. of California at Berkeley, among others.
     
  4. Oct 19, 2014 #3
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Math guidance for aspiring physicists/mathematicians
  1. Aspiring Physicist (Replies: 6)

Loading...