Mathematics descriptions of objects not found in the real world

In summary, there are many mathematical equations that describe patterns and objects that do not exist in the physical tangible university. These include high dimensional geometric objects and the sphere in 6000 dimensional Euclidean space. Mathematics may also describe possible worlds that we do not have access to in our current state of evolution. However, it is unclear what exactly the subject matter of mathematics is, as it does not have a clearly-defined focus like other fields such as physics and biology.
  • #1
pentazoid
146
0
What are some mathematical equations that described patterns and objects that you will not find in the real world, i.e. the physical tangible university. String theory doesn't count since mathematicians are waiting for a detector to be built that will observed the strings that are supposedly the fundamental entities of everything.
 
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  • #2
I'm not sure what you mean. Numbers themselves are not "found in the real world". Geometric figures such as points, lines, triangles, and circles are not "found in the real world".
 
  • #3
pentazoid said:
What are some mathematical equations that described patterns and objects that you will not find in the real world, i.e. the physical tangible university. String theory doesn't count since mathematicians are waiting for a detector to be built that will observed the strings that are supposedly the fundamental entities of everything.

Many high dimensional geometric objects do not currently correspond to physical things. Of course you never know for sure that science will not find some use for a mathematical object.

How about the sphere in 6000 dimensional Euclidean space? Currently is not associated with any physical theory.
 
  • #4
pentazoid said:
What are some mathematical equations that described patterns and objects that you will not find in the real world, i.e. the physical tangible university. String theory doesn't count since mathematicians are waiting for a detector to be built that will observed the strings that are supposedly the fundamental entities of everything.

I heard that the physical tangible university (PTU )is even better than the electoral college!. :) (Sorry, Sunday night)

Anyway; this is more of a phylosophical question, I think (maybe you intended it that
way). A weird think about mathematics is that, unlike the case with many other areas,
it does not have a clearly-defined subject matter: Physics ( at least the "meat and
potatos" , not the theoretical) is the study of the physical world. Biology is the study of
life, etc.
But it is not clear what much of the subject area of math is about.
My personal opinion is that mathematics describes possible worlds, while everyday
physics describes the observable world, and theoretical physics is close in subject
matter to mathematics.

I hope this is the angle you were going for.
 
  • #5
Just wanted to add a comment: we do not have full access to the whole
world out there: we can perceive images only within a certain wave-length,
same for sounds, etc. So there is a lot out there that seems (at least for
the moment) outside of our sensory reach. Note, e.g., the fact that dogs
have an olfactory sense that is many times more powerful than ours. Dogs
have access to a sensory portion of life that we have no access to at this
point. So the term 'real world' is maybe innacurate in this context.

Just note that this is a personal opinion here that I cannot rigorously support at this point:
Mathematics may be describing portions of the world we have no access to
at this point in our evolution. We live -- at least at this point -- in a very
remote, very small corner of the world of possible experiences.
 

Related to Mathematics descriptions of objects not found in the real world

1. What is the purpose of using mathematics to describe objects that do not exist in the real world?

The purpose of using mathematics to describe objects that do not exist in the real world is to help us understand and analyze abstract concepts and ideas. It allows us to create models and simulations that can help us make predictions and solve complex problems.

2. How is mathematics used to describe objects that are not found in the real world?

Mathematics uses abstract concepts, symbols, and equations to describe objects that do not exist in the real world. This allows us to manipulate these concepts and make logical deductions about their properties and behaviors.

3. Can mathematics accurately describe objects that do not have physical form?

Yes, mathematics can accurately describe objects that do not have physical form. This is because mathematics is based on logical principles and can be used to describe any abstract concept or idea.

4. What are some examples of objects that can be described using mathematics but do not exist in the real world?

Some examples of objects that can be described using mathematics but do not exist in the real world include imaginary numbers, fractals, and geometric shapes with infinite sides or dimensions.

5. How does using mathematics to describe non-existent objects impact our understanding of the real world?

Using mathematics to describe non-existent objects can help us develop new theories and ideas that can be applied in the real world. It also allows us to think abstractly and expand our understanding of the world beyond what we can physically observe.

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