Metrics on fields in physics with funding/activity?

In summary, the conversation discusses the metrics of funding and activity in various areas of physics, particularly in Europe. The focus is on determining if Quantum Information/Quantum Computing is a good field to specialize in and if there are other theoretical physics fields that are currently trending. The conversation also touches on the importance of considering individual interest and performance in a field, rather than solely focusing on funding and career opportunities.
  • #1
YellowBiro
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Are there any metrics that show which areas in physics have lots of funding and activity at this present moment? Of course it would vary by location as well. I'm mainly interested in Europe.

I am basically trying to figure out if Quantum Information/Quantum Computing is a good field to specialise in. Also want to see if there are other theoretical physics fields which are also "trending".
 
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  • #2
The absolute amount of money is not the right question. More total money in a field simply means more researchers but not better career chances.
Funding per researcher? Variations will mainly come from other costs (experiments, travel, ...) or the regional distribution: Incomes are higher in San Francisco than in the middle of nowhere, Montana - but living costs are higher as well.
Growth over time? This is getting more interesting, but also often hard to predict. You want future growth - but that means anticipating what will be interesting in the future before funding agencies do so. What is trending now doesn't have to be trending in a few years when it might be relevant for you. Do you expect to make better decisions than funding agencies?
YellowBiro said:
I am basically trying to figure out if Quantum Information/Quantum Computing is a good field to specialise in.
If and only if you are interested in it.
The main thing you can influence is your performance in the field. The best career chances in a field are useless if you can't be bothered contributing a lot to it. Better become the leading expert in whatever you are interested in.
 
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1. What are the most common types of metrics used in physics research?

Some of the most common metrics used in physics research include the h-index, impact factor, citation count, and collaboration index. These metrics are used to evaluate the productivity and impact of a researcher's work.

2. How do funding and activity affect metrics in physics research?

Funding and activity can have a significant impact on metrics in physics research. Researchers who secure funding are often able to produce more high-quality publications, leading to higher citation counts and impact factors. Similarly, active researchers who collaborate with others tend to have higher collaboration indexes and h-indices.

3. How do metrics vary between different fields in physics?

Metrics can vary significantly between different fields in physics. For example, fields such as astrophysics and high-energy physics tend to have higher citation counts and impact factors compared to more niche fields. This is due to the larger number of researchers and publications in these fields.

4. Are there any limitations to using metrics in physics research evaluation?

Yes, there are some limitations to using metrics in physics research evaluation. Metrics do not always accurately reflect the quality or impact of a researcher's work, as they may not account for factors such as the interdisciplinary nature of research or the impact of a single groundbreaking publication. Additionally, metrics do not take into account the individual research goals and objectives of a researcher.

5. How can researchers use metrics to improve their research impact?

Researchers can use metrics to track their progress and identify areas for improvement. By analyzing their h-index, citation count, and other metrics, they can determine which aspects of their research are having the most impact and focus on further developing those areas. Additionally, understanding the metrics used in their field can help researchers target high-impact journals and collaborations, ultimately increasing their research impact.

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