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Monthly Physics Competition Questionnaire

  1. May 31, 2013 #1
    Each month I will be hosting a question that, if answered correctly, will result in a free book of my choice to be delivered to the winner of the competition.

    This month's prize: Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica.

    The question for this month is the following: Why is it that objects that are held above the ground tend to fall towards the Earth?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 31, 2013 #2

    micromass

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    It is the will of Satan.
     
  4. May 31, 2013 #3
    It's not the objects falling towards the Earth, it's the Earth falling towards the objects
     
  5. May 31, 2013 #4

    WannabeNewton

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    It won't fall. You're holding it still above the ground. Kthxbai
     
  6. May 31, 2013 #5

    micromass

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    Close, but not quite. In reality, nothing falls towards eachother. It is our mind that makes it seem that things are falling. Without the mind, nothing is.
     
  7. May 31, 2013 #6
    I'm sorry, the answer we were looking for was

    Like I would give away the answer to an ongoing competition, you ignoramus.
     
  8. May 31, 2013 #7
    You're getting close! Keep following this train of thought, and you might just win a new book!
     
  9. May 31, 2013 #8

    micromass

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  10. May 31, 2013 #9
    Oh don't worry, we here at the annual/12 competition already know that you have a copy of that book which you enjoy very much, and would never think of supplying you with a book which you already possess.

    Assuming you don't have this book, then this remains our standard prize for this month.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  11. May 31, 2013 #10

    WannabeNewton

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    The answer is [itex]\mathcal{L}_{\boldsymbol{\psi}}(\epsilon_{abcd}\xi^{b}\nabla^{c}\xi^{d}) + 2\psi^{e}\nabla_{[a}(\epsilon_{e]fgh}\xi^{f}\nabla^{g}\xi^{h}) = 0
    [/itex]
     
  12. May 31, 2013 #11

    micromass

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    Reported for giving away crackpot books.
     
  13. May 31, 2013 #12

    micromass

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    But what does that mean?????
     
  14. May 31, 2013 #13

    WannabeNewton

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    Whatever you want it to mean young grasshopper.
     
  15. May 31, 2013 #14

    micromass

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    I see. To understand the equation, I must first become one with the equation.
     
  16. May 31, 2013 #15

    WannabeNewton

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    Yeah sure whatever turns you on brah
     
  17. May 31, 2013 #16
    Obviously you guys didn't read the fine print for this competition: All answers to my questions, just like all of physics, are devoid of any math, because of the pure uselessness and homeliness of mathematics in general.

    For this reason, WannabeNewton's answer remains, yet again, false.
     
  18. May 31, 2013 #17

    micromass

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    Can we use philosophy?
     
  19. May 31, 2013 #18

    WannabeNewton

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    This is tough. None of my textbooks cover this. After hours of deliberation I have, however, come upon a solution.

    Kate Upton.
     
  20. May 31, 2013 #19

    micromass

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    What do you find prettier:

    Kate Upton

    or

    [tex]\mathcal{L}_{\boldsymbol{\psi}}(\epsilon_{abcd}\xi^{b}\nabla^{c}\xi^{d} ) + 2\psi^{e}\nabla_{[a}(\epsilon_{e]fgh}\xi^{f}\nabla^{g}\xi^{h}) = 0[/tex]
     
  21. May 31, 2013 #20
    Of course.

    Ah, you've finally started using your brain. While Kate Upton isn't the exact answer, the units for this answer are in Kate Uptons; ie. 17 Kate Uptons, or 92 Kate Uptons.
     
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