Most exciting areas of research in Physics?

  • #1
Hi Everybody,

I have two questions, please share your opinions being as specific as possible.

1. Which fields of research in Physics do you consider to be most exciting and interesting?

2. Which fields of research in Physics do you consider to be most useful or applicable in industries, companies, government or research labs?

Thanks.

Sam
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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all

all
 
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Likes jamalkoiyess
  • #3
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1. Quantum Field Theory
2. Nuclear weapons research.
 
  • #4
Pythagorean
Gold Member
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Biology
 
  • #5
901
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1. Condensed Matter Physics/High Energy Physics/Bio-engineering/Quantum Computing
2. Condensed Matter Physics/Plasma Physics/ Quantum Computing/Bioengineering (There's too many!)
 
  • #6
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1. Which fields of research in Physics do you consider to be most exciting and interesting?
Definitely [email protected] There is a widespread consensus that this facility has the potential to trigger revolutions in our fundamental conceptions of space-time at very high-energy. A speculation concerns additional ordinary spatial dimensions. But what is often overlooked is that supersymmetry amounts to the addition of qualitatively different dimensions to space-time, dimensions which we could call fermionic. Even if supersymmetry is not found, we have the certainty that [email protected] will tell us about electroweak symmetry breaking, therefore testing models beyond the standard model of particle physics.
 
  • #8
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Definitely [email protected] There is a widespread consensus that this facility has the potential to trigger revolutions in our fundamental conceptions of space-time at very high-energy.

I'm sure it happens all the time, but we don't notice, for the moment our alternative reality is created, we loose all touch with the original, if it even continues to exist.

Well, that's one theory, anyway...
 
  • #9
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I'm sure it happens all the time, but we don't notice, for the moment our alternative reality is created, we loose all touch with the original, if it even continues to exist.
I am unsure that I understand what you mean. The standard model of particle physics is now half a century old. Besides a couple of tweaks here and there (like neutrino masses and the cosmological constant), there was no major revolution in fundamental physics since then. There were quite a few speculative proposals and mathematical breakthrough related to fundamental physics, but no confirmed result. It does not happen all the time that we switch on a machine which the physics community has been awaiting for two or three decades.
 
  • #10
Gokul43201
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i lol'd
I don't believe that was meant to be lol'd at. The physics of biological systems is a super-interesting and very fresh field with plenty of discoveries to be made, and it's of relevance to potential medium-term applications.
 
  • #11
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:uhh: I was kidding... :yuck:
 
  • #12
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I am unsure that I understand what you mean. The standard model of particle physics is now half a century old.

What in the world does "half a century" have to do with the fact that half the time I decide to take a dump in my toilet, and half the time I decide to take a dump in the toilet in my son's room?

Each choice sets a very similar, but different set of things in motion.
 
  • #13
2,425
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Each choice sets a very similar, but different set of things in motion.
I am talking about measurable importance in fundamental physics, as you can see for yourself from spires for instance. It concerns what professional physicists publish about. I still have no idea what you are talking about.
 
  • #14
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I still have no idea what you are talking about.

You know, sometimes I feel the same way... :)
 
  • #15
DevilsAvocado
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What in the world does "half a century" have to do with the fact that half the time I decide to take a dump in my toilet, and half the time I decide to take a dump in the toilet in my son's room?
I still have no idea what you are talking about.


humanino, you have my sympathies. Look up b*llsh*t in the dictionary and I’m sure it all will become clear.


(:biggrin:)
 
  • #16
DevilsAvocado
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TrustInsight, I’m not an expert, but as an advice from 'Life in General' – Choose the field that you find most interesting!

If this is possible: You’ll go laughing to work, you’ll be more creative, you’ll be more successful, etc, etc, and when you get older you won’t be asking the 'annoying question':

– Why the h*ll didn’t I follow my heart...!?


(If you are just looking for "money & fame", then you should maybe look for another occupation...)
 
  • #17
Pythagorean
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Yeah, was serious about biology.

Though, I can't argue with humanino that we have very interesting (and potentially paradigm shifting) things going on at CERN right now. I've been anxious to hear some results ever since they were first scheduled to go online.
 

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