Curious about how you've seen research work out

In summary, the conversation discusses the researcher's observation of the common process in nuclear materials research, where energetic particles are shot at a material and the effects are recorded and analyzed. The consistency in this formula is surprising, and raises the question of whether this is a common approach in all fields of research. The possibility of varying factors and personal opinions are also mentioned, but the conversation does not provide a definitive answer.
  • #1
random_soldier
80
10
Something I've seen in nuclear materials research is that all of them are basically, I have a material, I am going to shoot energetic particles at it, I am going to record the numbers, take some before and after pictures and talk about what I saw. It does make sense that you would research like this considering most materials in nuclear environments do suffer bombardment from energetic nuclei and subatomic particles.

The consistency in the formula of this research process, however, is something I did not expect. Is this how it works for every field when you get into something very specific and become an expert on it like in a PhD? For example, would experimental study of ionization in plasmas in space have you always looking at spectroscopic data from one cosmic body or another and accounting for what there is from your spectroscopic data and what all forces may have acted in that region and to what extent to give you what you have got?

Now that I put all my thoughts down, the answer seems like yes mostly. So I guess I'm probably looking for confirmation, unless there is something I didn't take note of.
 
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  • #2
random_soldier said:
For example, would experimental study of ionization in plasmas in space have you always looking at spectroscopic data from one cosmic body or another and accounting for what there is from your spectroscopic data and what all forces may have acted in that region and to what extent to give you what you have got?
There is no right or wrong answer, it's about who you are working for, what the grant is for, so many variables...

So, it's up to you, how do you feel about what you are being told to do, does it feel right? Can you live with it, or do you want to exit?

Due to the non-specific question, thread locked.
 

Related to Curious about how you've seen research work out

1. How do scientists decide on what research to pursue?

Scientists often conduct background research and use their expertise to identify gaps in knowledge or areas that need further exploration. They may also collaborate with other experts in the field to identify research topics that are relevant and have the potential for significant impact.

2. What is the process of conducting research?

The research process typically involves formulating a hypothesis, designing experiments or studies to test the hypothesis, collecting and analyzing data, and drawing conclusions based on the results. This process may vary depending on the type of research being conducted and can involve multiple iterations and revisions.

3. How do scientists ensure the validity of their research?

Scientists use various methods to ensure the validity of their research, such as conducting experiments under controlled conditions, using appropriate sample sizes, and using statistical analysis to analyze the data. They also often undergo a peer review process where other experts in the field evaluate the research methods and results.

4. How do scientists communicate their research findings?

Scientists commonly communicate their research findings through publications in scientific journals, presentations at conferences, and collaborations with other researchers. They may also use other forms of media, such as social media and blogs, to share their findings with a wider audience.

5. How do scientists use research to make a real-world impact?

Scientists use research to inform and guide decision-making in various fields, such as medicine, technology, and policy-making. The findings from research can be used to develop new treatments, improve existing technologies, and inform policies that can positively impact society.

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