MS degree: How "bad" is my situation?

  • Programs
  • Thread starter dRic2
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Degree
In summary, your university offers courses in both nuclear engineering and physics, and you think you will like the physics courses better. However, you are worried that you will not enjoy the engineering courses as much and that you will eventually become stuck in one field. You should try to find a path that lets you have reasonable exit options, and keep studying chemE in case it does not work out.
  • #1
dRic2
Gold Member
883
225
HI, it is not the first time I ask for advice, but I was very messy in my old posts because I wasn't even sure what I wanted. Now - I think - I finally got a glimpse of what I would like to do, but I would like your opinion whether or not it could be a good "plan".

So here is the deal (I'll try to be very quick).

When I enrolled to my university I was a bit of an idiot (I didn't like anything, I didn't want to study, very low GPA and I went for a BS in chemE just "for the sake of it" - I almost flipped a coin to choose my degree -, plus I was always doing the minimum amount of work to pass exams). During my second year I started to be interested in physics and math and I began to study harder and harder. Now I am really "addicted" to physics - just because I like it it doesn't mean I'm good at it though :frown: - and now I really want to do a M.S in physics. But I can't obviously: I have a sucky GPA and BS in engineering... If I really want to pursue a career in Physics I think the only reasonable option is to start all over again.
Well, my family is not ok with starting all over again so I can't do that either.

So I came up with this idea: since I became interested in particles physics (I'd like to study it rigorously and not just read some divulgative books about it) I thought "What if I go for a M.S in Nuclear engineering and then I try a PhD in Nuclear Physics?". Does it sound reasonable ? Or stupid ?

https://www4.ceda.polimi.it/manifes...OffertaInvisibile=false&semestre=ALL_SEMESTRI (these are some courses offered by my university)

Thanks
Ric
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
I think you need to think about and pursue a path that let's you have reasonable exit options along the way. Physics in general is a very competitive field and in no way does a master degree guarantee you will find a PhD, a PhD does definitely not guarantee that you will find a postdoc, and several postdocs do not guarantee you will find a tenure track position. This is true even for people who take the "straight path" and for someone in your position it is even more important to consider the exit options at every stage.
 
  • Like
Likes plasmon_shmasmon
  • #3
Thank you for your answer.

Orodruin said:
I think you need to think about and pursue a path that let's you have reasonable exit options along the way.

You are absolutely right, and that is the reason why I considered Nuclear engineering. It seems to offer a lot even if you don't end up in nuclear plant (maybe I'm wrong).

What actually scares me more than not finding a job is that I could be studying for an other 2 or more years something I don't really care about and eventually ending up doing it for the rest of my life. The natural choice would be to stick with chemE, but I noticed I am not that into it: for example I really like fluid mechanics and thermodynamics, but I don't like the engineering approach.

I feel like I got lost at the very beginning and now I'm struggling very hard to get on the right track, but maybe I just have to give up and accept my situation... :frown:
 
  • #4
dRic2 said:
The natural choice would be to stick with chemE, but I noticed I am not that into it: for example I really like fluid mechanics and thermodynamics, but I don't like the engineering approach

So why do you think you will like nuclear engineering any better?
 
  • #5
Vanadium 50 said:
So why do you think you will like nuclear engineering any better?

I talked to one professor of nuclear engineering in charge of evaluating the students' study plans proposals and he said "nuclear engineering is for those who likes physics and it offers a lot of courses of the physics department, but still prepares you as an engineer". So, in the end: yes, there will be things I don't like, but I don't see an other options. Should I sit and wait ? Or force myself to like chemE ?

I've been thinking about this a lot, and I could not come up with a better idea...

Anyway, the conclusion you suggest is to keep studying chemE?
 
  • #6
Usually your first year marks don't count towards the result. So if you are able to study really hard and get your marks up (with help from this site I suppose), it could still work out. I mean, I think it can be rescued.

If you are saying that you don't want to do it anymore, that just sounds like you don't really know what you want to do.
 
  • #7
verty said:
If you are saying that you don't want to do it anymore
Do what? I do not understand.

verty said:
usually your first year marks don't count towards the result. So if you are able to study really hard and get your marks up (with help from this site I suppose), it could still work out. I mean, I think it can be rescued.

I have just one exam left... I can't do much about it. If I calculated it right I went from 2 (the beginning of my second year) to 3 (maybe a little less - here we a different grading system). But I don't understand how it could help

Thank you all for the responses :smile:
 
  • #8
dRic2 said:
I talked to one professor of nuclear engineering in charge of evaluating the students' study plans proposals and he said "nuclear engineering is for those who likes physics and it offers a lot of courses of the physics department, but still prepares you as an engineer". So, in the end: yes, there will be things I don't like, but I don't see an other options. Should I sit and wait ? Or force myself to like chemE ?

I've been thinking about this a lot, and I could not come up with a better idea...

Anyway, the conclusion you suggest is to keep studying chemE?

What about going into EE and specializing in Accelerator Science?

https://www.physicsforums.com/threads/accelerator-physics-a-field-where-jobs-go-begging.410271/

There ARE other options than just NE if you want to do more physics but keep being an engineer.

Zz.
 
  • Like
Likes plasmon_shmasmon and dRic2
  • #9
dRic2 said:
Do what? I do not understand.

Oh sorry, I thought you were in your second year.

I have just one exam left... I can't do much about it.

You could be a chemist with a nice white coat. Or you could work in a factory doing tests. My dad did that and he dropped out of his university studies. He did a lesser qualification instead. And he worked in the industry his whole career. I think it's a very stable career choice, chemistry. I think your choice of degree wasn't too bad.
 
  • #10
ZapperZ said:
What about going into EE and specializing in Accelerator Science?

We do not have a specialization in Accelerator Science in my university.

But after your suggestion I searched and I did find a course named "Accelerator Physics" and it belongs to the Nuclear engineering degree program.

I think I'm pretty much out of luck... I don't see a way out...

I think I'll go for NE hoping it turns out something I could enjoy.
 
  • #11
dRic2 said:
We do not have a specialization in Accelerator Science in my university..

A lot of schools do not have that. It is why there are particle accelerator schools being offered at various times of the year.

All you need is a faculty member who is familiar with the program and willing to be your advisor. However, the program must be approved by your dept.

Zz.
 
  • #12
ZapperZ said:
However, the program must be approved by your dept.

Let's say I get my BS degree next month. I then apply to grad school and ask for this particular program?
 
  • #13
dRic2 said:
Let's say I get my BS degree next month. I then apply to grad school and ask for this particular program?

No, you must first check and see if any of the faculty members is already familiar with the accelerator science program and has supervised students in that area.

Zz.
 
  • Like
Likes dRic2
  • #14
Thank you @ZapperZ , your post gave me a bit of hope to find something new and interesting :smile:
 
  • #15
Ric, Noticed several of the courses -- differential geometry, particle physics, et cetera -- required for advanced physics are taught in what I presume is your native language. This may help you focus on the core material, though your written English is excellent.

I am not advising a military career, in fact took a vow after serving my country never to use my education for harm or to design weapon systems. With that caveat the Italian navy, presuming you are a citizen, may offer cadet officer training (called ROTC in the United States) and experience in nuclear propulsion systems and other applied fields such as electronics.

All my adult relatives served -- my mother performed data entry for the air force, my favourite auntie was a navy commander -- so my youthful orientation is different from many scientists. Perhaps a few weeks at sea working with advanced machinery beyond university budgets could inform your career choices while you complete your education. If military discipline is not to your liking, a civil internship may offer comparable experience.

--Norm
 

1. What are the job opportunities for someone with an MS degree?

The job opportunities for someone with an MS degree vary depending on the specific field of study. However, in general, individuals with an MS degree have a higher chance of obtaining a job in their desired field compared to those with just a bachelor's degree. Many industries, such as healthcare, finance, and technology, value individuals with advanced degrees and offer competitive job opportunities.

2. Will having an MS degree increase my salary?

Having an MS degree can potentially lead to a higher salary compared to someone with just a bachelor's degree or lower level of education. However, this also depends on the industry and job market. It is important to research the average salary for your desired career path with an MS degree to determine if it is worth pursuing.

3. Is an MS degree worth the time and financial investment?

An MS degree can be a significant time and financial investment, so it is important to consider if it aligns with your career goals and if you have the resources to commit to it. However, in many cases, the career advancement opportunities and potential for a higher salary make an MS degree worth the investment.

4. Are online MS degree programs as reputable as traditional on-campus programs?

The reputation and credibility of an online MS degree program depend on the institution offering it. It is important to research the accreditation and reputation of the institution before enrolling in an online program. In some cases, online programs can offer a more flexible and convenient option for obtaining an MS degree.

5. Can I pursue an MS degree while working full-time?

It is possible to pursue an MS degree while working full-time, but it may require careful time management and dedication. Many universities offer part-time or online options for their MS programs, making it more feasible for working professionals. It is important to consider the workload and commitment of the program before deciding to pursue it while working full-time.

Similar threads

  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
2
Views
924
  • STEM Academic Advising
2
Replies
50
Views
4K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
3
Views
815
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
17
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
7
Views
1K
Replies
6
Views
1K
Replies
22
Views
734
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
17
Views
1K
Replies
8
Views
1K
Back
Top