How do i get a nuclear engineering degree

In summary, this person is seeking a degree in Nuclear Engineering and intends to use their mathematical and computational skills to work in a technical field. They have taken classes in mathematics and physics and feel confident that they will be able to successfully complete a Nuclear Engineering program, provided they have a good GPA.
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brownsugarmilktea
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Summary:: how do i get a nuclear engineering degree

im attending a cal state right now and I am on track to finish my 4th year and get my BS in finance this spring. i want to pursue a BS(maybe even MS) in nuclear engineering immediately after, or preferably start this fall.

ideally, my end goal is to graduate from someplace like uc berkley(or any cool engineering school) with a ba/ma in ne. but let's be real my gpas not so hot right now so

i can try to cram a ton of cc credits(all the physics and math stuff i never took://) in this upcoming year and add that with my cal state credits(GEs and misc.) then hopefully! transfer and go through 2 yrs of uc for my BS

or i can go through an online AS program for nuclear science which can get me into the workforce asap and then use that to transfer in. basically filter my gpa through that school instead, getting a cool job in a power plant while I am at it.

you're making history here in these comments, people. I am going to be the elon musk of the nuclear industry.

any help is appreciated, thanks a ton!
 
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Welcome to PF.

brownsugarmilktea said:
finish my 4th year and get my BS in finance this spring.
brownsugarmilktea said:
but let's be real my gpas not so hot right now so

If your GPA is "not so hot" while studying Finance, why do you think you will do well in the much more technically demanding Engineering curriculum? What math have you taken so far? How did you do in your Calculus classes? What physics and engineering classes have you taken so far, and what did you think of them?
 
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  • #3
brownsugarmilktea said:
im going to be the elon musk of the nuclear industry.
Learn to write acceptable English. If you write like an illiterate dolt, people - including admissions committees - will conclude you are an illiterate dolt. That will hurt no matter where you go and what you do.

Other than that, @berkeman is 100% right. If your GPA is "not so hot" while studying Finance, why do you think you will do well in the much more technically demanding Engineering curriculum? And, more directly to the point, how will you convey this to the admissions committees.

Finally, do you think starting in Fall is realistic? Application deadlines were due 7 months ago. Berkeley made their decisions two months ago.
 
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  • #4
brownsugarmilktea said:
ideally, my end goal is to graduate from someplace like uc berkley(or any cool engineering school) with a ba/ma in ne.
One would get a BS or MS in Nuclear Engineering, from an ABET accredited program. UC Berkeley is one of many programs across the nation.

brownsugarmilktea said:
i can try to cram a ton of cc credits(all the physics and math stuff i never took://) in this upcoming year and add that with my cal state credits(GEs and misc.) then hopefully! transfer and go through 2 yrs of uc for my BS
Cramming a ton of CC credits (all the physics and math stuff i never took://) won't necessarily work, especially if one is struggling with the math one has taken, to which berkeman alluded. Upper level courses in engineering (nuclear, mechanical, electrical, aerospace, civil/structural, materials, . . . ) are mathematically/computationally intensive, especially if one wants to be a competent and proficient engineer.

As V50 indicated, learn to communicate/write like a professional.

brownsugarmilktea said:
online AS program for nuclear science which can get me into the workforce asap and then use that to transfer in. basically filter my gpa through that school instead,
Seriously!?

brownsugarmilktea said:
im going to be the elon musk of the nuclear industry.
Musk is a businessman/entrepreneur. He's more of a programmer, who did well and made a lot of money, then hired the right experts for Tesla and SpaceX (e.g., Tom Mueller).

See https://www.physicsforums.com/threa...in-creating-his-companies.930892/post-5878632

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Mueller
Thomas Mueller is an American rocket engineer and rocket engine designer. He was a founding employee of SpaceX, an American aerospace manufacturer and space transportation services company headquartered in Hawthorne, California.

He is best known for his engineering work on the TR-106 and SpaceX rocket engines. He is considered one of the world's leading spacecraft propulsion experts and holds several United States patents for propulsion technology.
 
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Related to How do i get a nuclear engineering degree

1. What is nuclear engineering?

Nuclear engineering is a field of study that involves the application of nuclear science and technology to solve various problems related to energy, medicine, and the environment.

2. What are the requirements for a nuclear engineering degree?

The requirements for a nuclear engineering degree vary depending on the institution, but generally, you will need a high school diploma or equivalent, strong background in math and science, and good grades. Some universities may also require specific courses such as physics and chemistry.

3. How long does it take to get a nuclear engineering degree?

A nuclear engineering degree typically takes four years to complete, but this may vary depending on the program and whether you choose to pursue a bachelor's or master's degree. Some universities also offer accelerated programs that allow students to finish their degree in a shorter amount of time.

4. What career opportunities are available with a nuclear engineering degree?

Graduates with a nuclear engineering degree have a wide range of career opportunities in industries such as energy, defense, healthcare, and research. Some common job titles include nuclear engineer, radiation protection specialist, and nuclear medicine technologist.

5. Is a nuclear engineering degree a good choice for me?

Deciding on a degree is a personal choice and depends on your interests, skills, and career goals. If you have a strong aptitude for math and science, a passion for nuclear technology, and a desire to make a positive impact on society, then a nuclear engineering degree may be a good choice for you.

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