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Natural Frequency of Stepped Shaft

  1. Apr 14, 2009 #1

    minger

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    Hi guys, I need to find the natural frequencies of a series of pressure rakes. We have a numerical model, but I'd like to confirm with a hand calculation. I would like to model the pressure rakes as a cantilevered beam with varying cross section (i.e. as each tube "stops" the beam decreases in area).

    I looked on Ohiolink for journal articles and through Timoshenko's Vibration Problems in Engineering but can't come up with anything. If anyone has an article, or a link somewhere I would appreciate it. Thansk,
     
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  3. Apr 14, 2009 #2

    FredGarvin

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    Your best bet is to plink them. That's what I do. You can get in the area or do a numerical analysis, but it is very difficult to match the boundary conditions they actually see. This way you will get the exact natural frequencies from a quick test that is easy to do.
     
  4. Apr 15, 2009 #3

    minger

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    Well we're designing them. Ideally we wouldn't want to buy a set, then find out that the parts we just bought have natural frequencies that cross certain excitation lines in our range of operation.

    Either way it might be a good idea to plink them after we receive them, but I'd like to have an idea of their response before.
     
  5. Apr 15, 2009 #4
    If I remember correctly you can treat a stepped shaft as a set of torsional springs arranged in series. Have a look at the first chapter of Vibration Problems in Engineering, by Weaver, Timoshenko and Young. I'm pretty sure it covers it in there.
     
  6. Apr 15, 2009 #5

    minger

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    I 'think' I seen what you are thinking of, but IIRC it didn't quite apply to me. Let me see if I can find it.

    Yea,
    OK, so this directly applies to torsional vibration, but I can assume it applies to lateral as well. If so, then how can I calculate equivalent spring constants for the bar?

    Would the individual spring constants simply be a long bar, with several hollow cylinders?
     
  7. Apr 15, 2009 #6
    For lateral vibration can't you treat it as a series of masses rotating on a shaft, but with mass and stiffness distributed over the same area? Try a later chapter in that book (or any in the series)...I think it's chapter 5.

    Edit: try finding the following paper if your subscription covers it - the approach and references should give you some help.

    Yu, S.D. and Cleghorn, W.L.
    Free Vibration of a Spinning Stepped Timoshenko Beam
    J. Appl. Mech. -- December 2000 -- Volume 67, Issue 4, 839 (3 pages)
    DOI:10.1115/1.1331282
     
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