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Needed: Low cost, USB Spectrum Analyzer/Osciliscope for use with a PC

  1. Sep 22, 2010 #1

    rhody

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    I am posting this for an EE engineer friend, need suggestions/link(s) to a USB Spectrum Analyzer. The more compact the better...

    Thanks in advance...

    Rhody...
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 22, 2010 #2
    Hi Rhody, Picoscopes could be a good option:

    http://www.picotech.com/picoscope2000.html


    But it all depends on the application the scope is to be used for. If your friend wants to fork out more than $400 bucks, than consider getting a Rigol normal scope which is ten-fold better than any usb scope at that price range:

    http://cgi.ebay.com/Rigol-DS1052E-DSO-Oscilloscope-2-Channel-50-MHz-1-GSa-s-/260605777102?pt=BI_Oscilloscopes&hash=item3cad5094ce [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  4. Sep 23, 2010 #3

    rhody

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    Thanks waht,

    He is checking them out now, wasn't aware of the 2000 series picoscope model.

    Rhody...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  5. Sep 23, 2010 #4
    There's also: http://www.bitscope.com/ which I considered, but perhaps unwisely decided on the ELAB-080 -- http://www.dynoninstruments.com/products.php [Broken] -- which has been satisfactory but not stellar and seems to be "out-of-stock" at the moment.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  6. Sep 23, 2010 #5
    The USB based scopes are borderline worthless for most applications other than learning about electronics. The Rigol and Instek scopes are very good if you are on a budget or a hobbyist. If you don't mind buying second hand, ebay is a good source for DSOs as well. I got my Agilent DSO3102A with cal certificate for under $500 shipped from ebay.

    If you are looking for a analyer that does more than FFT with basic windowing you're going to have to start shelling out some serious cash. If you have a scope with a decent sampling rate and memory depth you can export data to a PC and analyze it. I've done this using an old Tek TDS210 and matlab. Its not the most elegant solution but it works.
     
  7. Sep 24, 2010 #6

    rhody

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    Thanks schip666, Topher,

    I will pass this on to my friend, he says he is now considering building his own (assuming he knows precisely what he is trying to measure, and to what level of fidelity). I will see what he has to see after reading your responses.

    Rhody...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  8. Sep 24, 2010 #7
    I hope he's really good with FPGA's!
     
  9. Sep 24, 2010 #8
    What frequency range is he trying to analyze?

    If it's audio, there are programs that utilize your computer's sound card as an audio spectrum analyzer. There are also nice iphone spectrum analyzer apps too.
     
  10. Sep 24, 2010 #9

    rhody

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    Thanks waht,

    I spoke to him briefly, the freq ranges from audio to multi-megahertz range, he has some prices on new gear, is checking on used ones, and if non satisfy his needs, he may opt to build one himself, it is for personal use and he is amazing at doing things for a fraction of the price.

    Rhody...
     
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