Net Force on 1.6t Car on 40o Banked Icy Road

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In summary, the conversation is discussing the calculation of the net force acting on a 1.6t car parked on a smooth icy road banked at 40o. The equation Fd=mgsin\theta is being used, but there may be a mistake with the units. The person is seeking help to resolve the issue.
  • #1
chem_is_lovex
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Homework Statement


what is the net force acting on a 1.6t car initially parked on a smooth icy road banked at 40o. (frictional forces are negligible)


Homework Equations


Fd=mgsin[tex]\theta[/tex]


The Attempt at a Solution


I'm not too sure.
1600 x 9.8 x sin40

but it = the wrong number?? help!
 
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  • #2
chem_is_lovex said:

Homework Statement


what is the net force acting on a 1.6t car initially parked on a smooth icy road banked at 40o. (frictional forces are negligible)


Homework Equations


Fd=mgsin[tex]\theta[/tex]


The Attempt at a Solution


I'm not too sure.
1600 x 9.8 x sin40

but it = the wrong number?? help!

I believe you at least have a problem with units. What is the "ton" thing in terms of mks units? It's good to get in the habit of carrying units along in your equations, and multiplying and dividing them out just like you are doing with the numbers. If you are calculating a force in mks units, the answer's units had better be in kg*m/s^2, right?
 
  • #3


I would approach this problem by first identifying all the forces acting on the car. In this case, the only force acting on the car is its weight (mg) which can be broken down into two components: the normal force (N) perpendicular to the surface of the road, and the force due to gravity (mg) acting parallel to the surface of the road. Since the road is banked at an angle of 40 degrees, we can use trigonometry to determine the magnitude of these components.

The normal force (N) is equal to the weight of the car (mg) multiplied by the cosine of the angle of the bank (40 degrees). This gives us a value of 1600 x 9.8 x cos40 = 12,249.49 N.

The force due to gravity acting parallel to the surface of the road is equal to the weight of the car (mg) multiplied by the sine of the angle of the bank (40 degrees). This gives us a value of 1600 x 9.8 x sin40 = 8,199.66 N.

Since the frictional forces are negligible, the net force acting on the car is simply the force due to gravity (8,199.66 N) since there are no other forces acting in the horizontal direction.

Therefore, the net force acting on the 1.6t car on the 40 degree banked icy road is 8,199.66 N. It is important to note that this net force is not causing the car to move, but rather keeping it in equilibrium on the banked surface. Any additional force, such as a push or a strong gust of wind, could cause the car to move.
 

1. What is net force on a 1.6t car on a 40o banked icy road?

The net force on a 1.6t car on a 40o banked icy road is the sum of all forces acting on the car in a specific direction. It includes the force of gravity, the normal force from the banked road, and the force of friction from the icy surface.

2. How do you calculate net force on a car on a banked road?

To calculate the net force on a car on a banked road, you need to first determine the forces acting on the car, including gravity, normal force, and friction. Then, you can use the formula Fnet = ma, where Fnet is the net force, m is the mass of the car, and a is the acceleration in the direction of the net force.

3. What factors affect the net force on a car on a banked icy road?

The net force on a car on a banked icy road can be affected by several factors, including the mass of the car, the angle of the banked road, the coefficient of friction between the car's tires and the icy surface, and the speed of the car.

4. How does the net force on a car on a banked icy road affect its motion?

The net force on a car on a banked icy road determines the direction and speed of its motion. If the net force is greater than zero, the car will accelerate in the direction of the net force. If the net force is zero, the car will maintain a constant speed. And if the net force is less than zero, the car will decelerate in the opposite direction of the net force.

5. How can the net force on a car on a banked icy road be reduced?

The net force on a car on a banked icy road can be reduced by decreasing the car's speed, increasing the coefficient of friction between the tires and the icy surface, or reducing the angle of the banked road. Additionally, using winter tires with better traction can also help reduce the net force on a car on a banked icy road.

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