New Earth-sister Kepler 452b announced by NASA

  • NASA
  • Thread starter DaveC426913
  • Start date
  • #51
429
117
I would be surprised, the planet is far away, small and next to a relatively bright star. On the other hand, I'm surprised by science frequently...
E-ELT is under construction, spectroscopy of exoplanet atmospheres is one of the main science goals.
Kepler-452b has one advantage going for it - the exoplanet was discovered using the transit method. Which should make the spectroscopy of Kepler-452b much more likely. Exoplanet atmospheres would be extremely difficult to discern if they did not transit in front of their parent star. We would have to wait until the James Webb Space Telescope came on-line in late 2018.
 
  • #52
DaveC426913
Gold Member
18,597
2,053
Kepler-452b has one advantage going for it - the exoplanet was discovered using the transit method.
True. Though that makes me wonder why they don't already know whether its rocky or gaseous. Surely the light curve would be markedly different for each.
 
  • #53
33,891
9,608
True. Though that makes me wonder why they don't already know whether its rocky or gaseous. Surely the light curve would be markedly different for each.
Why?
The orbital speed is about 30 km/s, an atmosphere of ~50 km (with relevant density) would influence the light curve by less than a percent (1% of a 0.01%-effect!), and only alter the shape for about 2 seconds each. There is no way to see such a small and short effect with Kepler.
 
  • #54
Bandersnatch
Science Advisor
2,899
1,760
True. Though that makes me wonder why they don't already know whether its rocky or gaseous. Surely the light curve would be markedly different for each.
Head to:
http://www.planethunters.org/
where you can help classify light curves collected by the Kepler mission. The follow up observations are somewhat more detailed, and their data can be seen in the discovery papers listed on that site.
It should help appreciate what kind of data constitutes a transit and how much can you read out of it.

Here's an example for Kepler-289 d:
Capture.PNG
 
  • #55
DaveC426913
Gold Member
18,597
2,053
Head to:
http://www.planethunters.org/
where you can help classify light curves collected by the Kepler mission. The follow up observations are somewhat more detailed, and their data can be seen in the discovery papers listed on that site.
It should help appreciate what kind of data constitutes a transit and how much can you read out of it.
Yeah, I've done a fair bit of planet hunting there.
 
  • #56
They might be broadcasting their own version of Star-Trek!
Maybe they have a less annoying Cpt. T. Kirk.
 
  • #57
  • #58
3,379
942
Yes I knew of the JWST, but this seems to be more of a replacement for Hubble (with extended infrared sensitivity).
I'm not sure if it could be used for the same type of planet-finding work which Kepler is doing.
 
  • #59
33,891
9,608
TESS is basically an improved Kepler telescope.

It can reveal interesting candidates for observations with JWST which has a much broader science mission (JWST cannot keep observing the same stars for years).

PLATO could be even better, but certainly later.

See also the "Exoplanet search projects" navigation bar at the end of the article for more missions.
 
  • #60
Yes I knew of the JWST, but this seems to be more of a replacement for Hubble (with extended infrared sensitivity).
I'm not sure if it could be used for the same type of planet-finding work which Kepler is doing.
One of its main objectives is to study the atmospheres of exoplanets and search for the building blocks of life.
 
  • #61
  • #62
2
0
A tragedy this planet is so far away. At this distance it's very difficult to analyze the planets properties and all we can do are assumptions about the surface and interior. There may yet be types of planets we know nothing about and hence we cannot say for sure if this planet is earth-like at all. But every discovery is a step towards new knowledge and so I am very glad we kno finally about a potential earth-like planet around a sun-like star. The other information on the website are very interesting. If one boldly assumes there evolved intelligent life on this planet, the civilization could be very likely ahead of us or already lost to extinction. Well, listening won't hurt anyone...
 
  • #63
If one boldly assumes there evolved intelligent life on this planet, the civilization could be very likely ahead of us or already lost to extinction. Well, listening won't hurt anyone...
A civilization could also be less advanced than us too. The planet may be older than Earth but live could have evolved later than it did here.
 
  • #64
139
17
Maybe they have a less annoying Cpt. T. Kirk.
Or less whiny members on their physics forums.
 

Related Threads for: New Earth-sister Kepler 452b announced by NASA

Replies
10
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
18
Views
2K
Replies
3
Views
1K
Replies
3
Views
929
Replies
25
Views
4K
Replies
20
Views
3K
Top