New Member with a Tipping Force Question

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I am seeking some professional help regarding a recent single man lift I purchased. My question is regarding tipping force calculations. I will try to explain all of the pertenent details as best as possible.

The lift I bought weighs approximately 600 lbs. It moves around on caster wheels but it has holes in the frame to accept forklift forks. I have a New Holland farm tractor that has forks on it. The tractor itself is 6 ft. wide and 8 ft. long. It weighs 3500 lbs and the two rear tire have liquid ballast in them bringing the total weight of the tractor to 4100 lbs.

If the lift is used on a level surface, it has mechanical outriggers to keep it from tipping over. I want to set it up so I can pin it to my forks for moving it around to different locations without having to use the outriggers. The basket you stand in weighs approximately 150 lbs. It extends to a maximum height of 25 ft. The basket is rated for 300lb lift capacity. At maximum lift capacity, the lift extended to it's max height of 25 ft., would the weight of the tractor keep the lift stable enough so it could not tip over? Can this be calculated?

Most of the intended work locations are flat. An occasional angled work surface would play a big part in tipping force. I have no idea on how to determine if my plan is safe. Modern lifts are equipped with sensors that alert you to unsafe conditions. If more info is need to provide me with an opinion, I will do my best to try and provide it. In my mind, I think the method of operating the lift would be quite safe and long as it was on a level surface. But limitations as far as non level working surfaces would be very helpful as well. Look forward to hearing some professional opinions on this. Thanks
 
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berkeman
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Thread is in Moderation temporarily for review by the Mentors...
 
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NP, how long does it usually take for approval? I think it is a worthy topic.
 
  • #4
berkeman
Mentor
57,957
8,035
I am seeking some professional help regarding a recent single man lift I purchased. My question is regarding tipping force calculations. I will try to explain all of the pertenent details as best as possible.

The lift I bought weighs approximately 600 lbs. It moves around on caster wheels but it has holes in the frame to accept forklift forks. I have a New Holland farm tractor that has forks on it. The tractor itself is 6 ft. wide and 8 ft. long. It weighs 3500 lbs and the two rear tire have liquid ballast in them bringing the total weight of the tractor to 4100 lbs.

If the lift is used on a level surface, it has mechanical outriggers to keep it from tipping over. I want to set it up so I can pin it to my forks for moving it around to different locations without having to use the outriggers. The basket you stand in weighs approximately 150 lbs. It extends to a maximum height of 25 ft. The basket is rated for 300lb lift capacity. At maximum lift capacity, the lift extended to it's max height of 25 ft., would the weight of the tractor keep the lift stable enough so it could not tip over? Can this be calculated?

Most of the intended work locations are flat. An occasional angled work surface would play a big part in tipping force. I have no idea on how to determine if my plan is safe. Modern lifts are equipped with sensors that alert you to unsafe conditions. If more info is need to provide me with an opinion, I will do my best to try and provide it. In my mind, I think the method of operating the lift would be quite safe and long as it was on a level surface. But limitations as far as non level working surfaces would be very helpful as well. Look forward to hearing some professional opinions on this. Thanks
After Mentor review, this thread will stay closed.

We do not allow "dangerous discussions" at PhysicsForums for a number of reasons, including liability issues, but also we don't want future viewers of threads to try dangerous things in their particular setting with their particular variations that lead to bad things happening.

Here are a couple of quotes from the Mentor discussion. Please seek out a professional engineer in your area who can give you face-to-face advice on your project. Please be safe.

I believe there is an OSHA rule against working off forklift forks. That would go double for working off farm tractor forks.

Tractor tires are springs. Do NOT support a manlift on springs. A little resonant vibration (swaying) triggered by moving around on it while raised, and over it goes. There is a reason for those outriggers.

Bottom line: Both unsafe and illegal.
We don't give "professional" help. That term implies legal liability.
 

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