Newton's Laws Homework question: Double incline mass problem

In summary: Can you please post them again?Those equations don't make much sense. Can you please post them again?
  • #1
NotSoRobot
2
0

Homework Statement


I have a double incline mass problem where Φ=43° and θ=20°, mass_A=1.00kg and they are connected by a massless string where the net force of each block is equal to 0.

Homework Equations


I believe I am to use Newton's 2nd law to find the force of the tension which I have next to my FBD. Since they were both 0 I set them equal to each other as you can see the arrows are directing in the photo, but I'm kind of lead nowhere. :/ I'll post the photo in 3.

My equations are:
$$\vec {T}_1 = m_A g + \hline \vec {T}_1 \cos {\phi}$$
and
$$\vec{T}_2=m_Ag+\hline \vec{T}_2\cos{\theta}$$
which I set equal to each other. I think this is how I would describe ##\vec{T}_1## and ##\vec{T}_2## with vector addition.

The Attempt at a Solution


https://livecsupomona-my.sharepoint.com/:i:/r/personal/dlsanjenis_cpp_edu/Documents/Attachments/52588613_813119429043085_4437430197272182784_n.jpg?csf=1&e=Ihd80l
[/B]
 

Attachments

  • 52606089_2336512989715836_7032607878858932224_n.jpg
    52606089_2336512989715836_7032607878858932224_n.jpg
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  • massB.png
    massB.png
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Last edited:
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  • #2
Your first two images are behind some login barrier. Please upload them directly to the forum using the tools in the toolbar.

The image of your working is sideways-on and hard to read. The bits of equations I could decipher made no sense to me.
Start with one block. What are the forces acting on it? What equations can you write?
Please type in your answers. Images are for textbook extracts and diagrams.
 
  • #3
haruspex said:
Your first two images are behind some login barrier. Please upload them directly to the forum using the tools in the toolbar.
I'm not sure how to put them directly into the forum. I need a link, perhaps I could see if I could make this particular line public.

Edit: I guess i just figured it out, I will improve the equations now.

2ndEdit: I'm not sure how to fix my forumlas. I used the correct delimiters, but there is something else I'm not catching.
 

Attachments

  • massB.png
    massB.png
    4.7 KB · Views: 357
Last edited:
  • #4
NotSoRobot said:
I'm not sure how to put them directly into the forum. I need a link, perhaps I could see if I could make this particular line public.

Edit: I guess i just figured it out, I will improve the equations now.

2ndEdit: I'm not sure how to fix my forumlas. I used the correct delimiters, but there is something else I'm not catching.
I assumed you would be posting new equations. Are you still working on this?
You mention delimiters. Are you struggling with LaTeX?
 
Last edited:
  • #5
NotSoRobot said:

Homework Statement


I have a double incline mass problem where Φ=43° and θ=20°, mass_A=1.00kg and they are connected by a massless string where the net force of each block is equal to 0.

Homework Equations


I believe I am to use Newton's 2nd law to find the force of the tension which I have next to my FBD. Since they were both 0 I set them equal to each other as you can see the arrows are directing in the photo, but I'm kind of lead nowhere. :/ I'll post the photo in 3.

My equations are:
$$\vec {T}_1 = m_A g +\color{red}{\text{ \hline }} \ \ \vec {T}_1 \cos {\phi}$$
and
$$\vec{T}_2=m_Ag+\color{red}{\text{ \hline} }\ \ \vec{T}_2\cos{\theta}$$
which I set equal to each other. I think this is how I would describe ##\vec{T}_1## and ##\vec{T}_2## with vector addition.

The Attempt at a Solution


https://livecsupomona-my.sharepoint.com/:i:/r/personal/dlsanjenis_cpp_edu/Documents/Attachments/52588613_813119429043085_4437430197272182784_n.jpg?csf=1&e=Ihd80l [/B]
Nothing wrong with your LaTeX delimiters. I placed the \hline in a text box &colored it red.

I'm not sure what you were trying to do with the \hline command.

Those equations don't make much sense.
 

Related to Newton's Laws Homework question: Double incline mass problem

1. What are Newton's Laws and how do they apply to this homework problem?

Newton's Laws of Motion are three fundamental principles that help us understand the behavior of objects in motion. They state that an object will remain in a state of rest or uniform motion unless acted upon by an external force, and that the force applied to an object is directly proportional to its mass and acceleration. In this homework problem, we will be using these laws to analyze the motion of a mass on a double incline.

2. How do I approach solving this double incline mass problem using Newton's Laws?

The first step is to identify the forces acting on the object, including the normal force, weight, and any other external forces. Then, use Newton's Second Law (F = ma) to calculate the net force on the object in each direction. Finally, use Newton's Third Law to equate the forces in the x and y directions to the corresponding components of acceleration.

3. What is the difference between static and kinetic friction, and how do they affect the motion of the mass in this problem?

Static friction is the force that prevents an object from moving when a force is applied to it, while kinetic friction is the force that opposes the relative motion between two surfaces. In this problem, static friction will be present until the force applied to the mass exceeds the maximum static friction force, at which point the mass will begin to move and kinetic friction will come into play.

4. Can I use Newton's Laws to solve this problem even if the mass is not in equilibrium?

Yes, Newton's Laws can still be used to solve this problem even if the mass is not in equilibrium. As long as we accurately calculate the net force on the mass in each direction, we can use Newton's Second Law to determine the resulting acceleration. However, if the mass is not in equilibrium, it may require additional calculations or a different approach to solve the problem.

5. Are there any common mistakes or misconceptions to watch out for when applying Newton's Laws to this problem?

One common mistake is neglecting to consider all the forces acting on the object, such as the normal force and friction. It is also important to make sure the acceleration is calculated correctly in both the x and y directions, as well as keeping track of the signs of the forces to ensure they are properly equated. Additionally, it is important to remember that Newton's Laws are idealized and may not always perfectly reflect real-world situations.

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