Operator splitting? What is it in the context of transport modeling?

Hello all:

I'm a thermodynamicist wanting to get into transport modeling. In my reading, I have come across "operator splitting." I'm confused about exactly what this means in the context of transport modeling.

This is probably a silly question, but does it refer to an advective term relative to a diffusive term in a transport equation? Or does it refer to doing a thermodynamics (or equilibration/compositional) step and THEN a fluid flow step?

I have set up my own little example code to model chemical reactions during flow. I first carry out a thermodynamics step to get compositional information and then I perform a flow step. Is this operator splitting??

Thanks in advance for your patience with a rookie!
 
19,274
3,817
Hello all:

I'm a thermodynamicist wanting to get into transport modeling. In my reading, I have come across "operator splitting." I'm confused about exactly what this means in the context of transport modeling.

This is probably a silly question, but does it refer to an advective term relative to a diffusive term in a transport equation? Or does it refer to doing a thermodynamics (or equilibration/compositional) step and THEN a fluid flow step?

I have set up my own little example code to model chemical reactions during flow. I first carry out a thermodynamics step to get compositional information and then I perform a flow step. Is this operator splitting??

Thanks in advance for your patience with a rookie!
Use of dimensionless groups is a very powerful tool for analyzing physical and chemical problems. Over the years, I have come to recognize that all physical systems are more fundamentally described in terms of their dimensionless groups than in terms of the individual parameters associated with the system. So for example, even though the total number of physical parameters involved may be 8, the number of dimensionless groups involved may only be 4 or 5. This allows the results to calculations to be presented once and for all in terms of the limited number of dimensionless groups rather than in terms of varying the individual parameters. This makes the results much easier to understand and more concise. And, if a system behavior is being examined experimentally, it reduces the number of experiments needed to quantify the range of behavior. Finally, straightforward methods have been developed for reducing the differential equations or algebraic equations for a system to dimensionless form so that the behavior can be directly determined in terms of the key dimensionless groups.
 

Want to reply to this thread?

"Operator splitting? What is it in the context of transport modeling?" You must log in or register to reply here.

Related Threads for: Operator splitting? What is it in the context of transport modeling?

Replies
2
Views
6K
Replies
20
Views
24K
  • Posted
Replies
12
Views
7K
  • Posted
Replies
14
Views
3K
  • Posted
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Posted
2
Replies
25
Views
5K

Physics Forums Values

We Value Quality
• Topics based on mainstream science
• Proper English grammar and spelling
We Value Civility
• Positive and compassionate attitudes
• Patience while debating
We Value Productivity
• Disciplined to remain on-topic
• Recognition of own weaknesses
• Solo and co-op problem solving

Hot Threads

Top