Optical Illusion: Maximize for Creepy Effect

  • Thread starter dontdisturbmycircles
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In summary: I never knew that. Thanks for the explanation. In summary, this optical illusion is called a gravity hill and it is where the letters look the same color even though they are not. It is tricky to see because you have to squint and look at it through partially closed eyes. This one is better because it is easier to see.
  • #1
Try it, its creepy. Its probably best to click "Maximize" at the top right of the video before playing.

http://emuse.ebaumsworld.com/watch/5850 [Broken]
 
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  • #2
very cool!
 
  • #3
Thanks. I love optical illusions! :!)
 
  • #4
Oh man! I always fall for those screamer tricks!
 
  • #5
haha yeah i thought it would be one of those "scary" turn-your-volume up ones but its not. Its actually really cool.
 
  • #6
Screamers have ruined the world of optical illusions for everyone...
 
  • #7
Hee...yeah, that's what I was expecting too. I even turned the volume down on my computer before I viewed it so I wouldn't scare the cat. :rofl:
 
  • #8
250px-Optical.greysquares.arp.jpg


This ones cool.

A and B are the same color!
 
  • #9
the colour of the letters themselves, not the squares they're on?
 
  • #10
No, the squares. Not the letters.
 
  • #11
tricky...
 
  • #12
Yeah, that was posted somewhere else before, and the only way to convince myself they were the same color was to put the image into photoshop and use the eyedropper tool to pick up the color from each square and look at the color values. Though, I just noticed that if you really squint hard and look at it through partially closed eyes, you can tell it's the same color too (mostly by eliminating more of the context with the squinting).
 
  • #13
this ones much better

 
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  • #14
This too

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-5947377811299306927&q=optical+illusion [Broken]
 
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  • #15
and this

 
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  • #16
This is also another really cool optical illusion found all over the globe known as gravity hills. http://abclocal.go.com/wpvi/story?section=local&id=4958578 (play the video at the right)

apparently if youstart from rest with a car in neutral it will appear to roll up hill without hitting gas. it would seem like the hill is defying the laws of physics but it is just an optical illusion of the landscape.
 
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  • #17
http://video.google.com/url?docid=-3007153806728356812&esrc=gvpl&ev=v&q=optical+illusion&vidurl=http://video.google.com/videoplay%3Fdocid%3D-3007153806728356812%26q%3Doptical%2Billusion&usg=AL29H21I67GUjNu_F1tHru0Dmzzg3kJbfg" [Broken]
 
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  • #18
dontdisturbmycircles said:
Try it, its creepy. Its probably best to click "Maximize" at the top right of the video before playing.

http://emuse.ebaumsworld.com/watch/5850 [Broken]
Well, I followed the instructions, but the B&W image still looked B&W, but with a bluish tint. But interestingly, I could see the bluish tint dissipate as the cones in my retina adjusted.

Intersting stuff! :approve:
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/vision/rodcone.html

The "blue" cones are identified by the peak of their light response curve at about 445 nm. They are unique among the cones in that they constitute only about 2% of the total number and are found outside the fovea centralis where the green and red cones are concentrated. Although they are much more light sensitive than the green and red cones, it is not enough to overcome their disadvantage in numbers. However, the blue sensitivity of our final visual perception is comparable to that of red and green, suggesting that there is a somewhat selective "blue amplifier" somewhere in the visual processing in the brain.

I see well in low light (near darkness).
 
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  • #19
cyrusabdollahi said:
250px-Optical.greysquares.arp.jpg


This ones cool.

A and B are the same color!

Wow. That's amazing!
 
  • #20
 
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1. What is an optical illusion?

An optical illusion is a visual phenomenon where our brain is tricked into perceiving something that is not actually there or is different from what it appears to be. It is caused by the way our brain processes and interprets visual information.

2. How do optical illusions work?

Optical illusions work by exploiting the way our brain perceives and interprets visual information. Our brain is constantly trying to make sense of the world around us, and optical illusions take advantage of this by creating conflicting or ambiguous visual cues that our brain struggles to interpret.

3. What makes an optical illusion creepy?

An optical illusion can be considered creepy when it creates a sense of unease, discomfort, or fear in the viewer. This can be achieved through the use of unsettling imagery, distorted or unnatural movements, or unexpected or unpredictable elements in the illusion.

4. Are there any potential negative effects of viewing optical illusions?

No, there are no known negative effects of viewing optical illusions. They are simply tricks of the mind and do not pose any physical or psychological harm. However, some people may experience discomfort or fear when viewing particularly creepy optical illusions.

5. Can optical illusions be used for any practical purposes?

Yes, optical illusions can be used for practical purposes such as in art, design, and entertainment. They can also be used in cognitive and neurological research to study how our brain processes visual information. Additionally, some optical illusions can be used as tools for visual perception training and rehabilitation for individuals with visual impairments or brain injuries.

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