Oscillation equilibrium problem

In summary, the problem involves a 4.40 kg block hanging from a spring with a spring constant of 1700 N/m. The block is pulled down 6.30 cm from the equilibrium position and given an initial velocity of 1.10 m/s back toward equilibrium. The missing information is the amplitude and the total mechanical energy of the motion. The amplitude is the distance from equilibrium to the maximum stretch point, and the total mechanical energy can be found by considering the initial energy of the mass/spring system. By measuring the stretching or compression of the spring from the equilibrium point of the mass, the effect of gravity can be disregarded.
  • #1
dtesselstrom
31
0
A 4.40 kg block hangs from a spring with spring constant 1700 N/m. The block is pulled down 6.30 cm from the equilibrium position and given an initial velocity of 1.10 m/s back toward equilibrium.

I have no idea how to start such a problem. If anyone could give me a idea of where to start Id be very thankful.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
First, state the whole problem. You have stated the initial conditions, but not what you are being asked to find. Whatever it is you are supposed to be finding, you can probably get there by considering the initial energy of the mass/spring system.
 
  • #3
ya just realized I forgot that the part I am having problem with is
What is the amplitude?
What is the total mechanical energy of the motion?
 
  • #4
dtesselstrom said:
ya just realized I forgot that the part I am having problem with is
What is the amplitude?
What is the total mechanical energy of the motion?
A stretched or compressed spring has potential energy. How much?? A moving mass has kinetic energy. How much?? For a mass hanging on a spring gravity only alters things by moving the eqwuilibrium position of the mass, so you don't have to worry about gravity if you measure the stretching or compression of the spring from the equilibrium point of the mass.

The amplitude is the distance from equilibrium to the maximum stretch point. At this point all the energy is the spring energy.
 
  • #5
Ok I figured it out thanks for the help.
 

1. What is oscillation equilibrium?

Oscillation equilibrium is a state in which an oscillating system remains in a steady, balanced position. This means that the system is constantly moving back and forth around a central point, but the average position of the system does not change over time.

2. How is oscillation equilibrium different from static equilibrium?

In static equilibrium, an object remains at rest or in a fixed position without any movement or acceleration. In oscillation equilibrium, the object is constantly moving but remains in a balanced position.

3. What factors affect the stability of oscillation equilibrium?

The stability of oscillation equilibrium is affected by factors such as the mass of the oscillating object, the strength of the restoring force, and the damping or resistance in the system.

4. What is the role of equilibrium in an oscillating system?

The equilibrium in an oscillating system is the point where the forces acting on the object are balanced and there is no net force. This allows the object to continue oscillating without any external forces causing it to speed up or slow down.

5. How can the oscillation equilibrium problem be solved mathematically?

The oscillation equilibrium problem can be solved using mathematical equations such as Newton's second law of motion, which relates the forces acting on the object to its acceleration. Differential equations can also be used to model and solve the oscillation equilibrium problem.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
977
Replies
8
Views
795
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
13
Views
613
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
29
Views
895
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
19
Views
991
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
31
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
905
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
11
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
1K
Back
Top