Parabolic Projectile Motion problem.

In summary, the conversation discusses a golfer hitting a ball to a green that is elevated, and the calculation of the ball's speed before it lands. The relevant variables and equations are mentioned, and the concept of projectile motion is explained. It is determined that there is no horizontal acceleration, simplifying the calculation.
  • #1
ssjcory
11
0

Homework Statement


A golfer hits a shot to a green that is elevated 3.00 m above the point where the ball is struck. The ball leaves the club at a speed of 14.0 m/s at an angle of 40 degrees above the horizontal. It rises to it's maximum height and then falls down to the green. Ignoring air resistance, find the speed of the ball just before it lands.

So I say that we have these variables:
Yi(Initial y position) = 0
Yf(Final y position) = 3m
Xi(Initial x position) = 0
Xf(Final x position) = unknown
Vi(Initial velocity) = 14
Ti(Initial time) = 0
AYc(Gravity y accel) = -9.8
Initial angle of motion = 40 deg

Homework Equations


I think these equations are relevant
Horizontal Velocity = magnitude * Cosine(theta)
Vertical Velocity = magnitude * sin (theta)
Xf = Xi + VXi(Tf - Ti) + 1/2 Ax (Tf - Ti)^2
Yf = Yi + VYi(Tf - Ti) + 1/2 Ax (Tf - Ti)^2


The Attempt at a Solution


I drew a crappy diagram to get the vision of the green being higher than the tee.
My XY axis cross at ground level.

First I tried getting the direction specific velocities based on the angle and the initial velocity
VYi = 14 sin(40) == 8.999
VXi = 14 cos(40 == 10.725

I guessed that I would substitute those into the 3rd/4th equations listed up top. But I didn't know Ax so I assume it is constant? I am so confused about where to go from here.

Can anyone point me in the right direction?

Thanks,
Cory
 
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  • #2
The whole idea behind projectile motion is that it is motion of an object that is in free fall, meaning that it is under the influence of gravity only. No other forces are acting. As a result, Newton's 2nd law says that a_x = 0. There is no horizontal acceleration. That simplifies your x equation somewhat.
 

Related to Parabolic Projectile Motion problem.

1. What is parabolic projectile motion?

Parabolic projectile motion is the curved path that an object follows when it is thrown near the Earth's surface. It occurs when a body is subject to a constant force, such as gravity, and moves along a parabolic trajectory.

2. What factors affect parabolic projectile motion?

The factors that affect parabolic projectile motion include the initial velocity of the object, the angle at which it is thrown, the mass of the object, and the force of gravity.

3. How do you calculate the maximum height of a parabolic projectile?

The maximum height of a parabolic projectile can be calculated using the equation h = (v2sin2θ)/2g, where h is the maximum height, v is the initial velocity, θ is the angle of launch, and g is the acceleration due to gravity.

4. What is the range of a parabolic projectile?

The range of a parabolic projectile is the horizontal distance it travels before hitting the ground. It can be calculated using the equation R = (v2sin2θ)/g, where R is the range, v is the initial velocity, θ is the angle of launch, and g is the acceleration due to gravity.

5. How is parabolic projectile motion used in real life?

Parabolic projectile motion is used in many real-life applications, such as in sports like baseball and football, where players need to throw or kick a ball with a specific angle and velocity to reach their target. It is also used in engineering and physics to study the motion of objects in flight and design projectiles for various purposes.

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