Parallel path in lap and wave winding

In summary, lap winding has the same number of parallel paths as there are poles, while wave winding always has two parallel paths. However, it can be confusing to locate the parallel path in both cases, especially for those new to the subject. It is recommended to download and print a copy of reliance.com/mtr/mtrthrmn.htm, but be aware that it uses CGS units and may refer to current flow in the "wrong" direction. Both schools of thought, the "engineer's current" and "real current", can be useful in understanding lap and wave winding.
  • #1
ajayguhan
153
1
i know that in lap winding the number of parallel path are equal to the number of poles, and in wave winding its always two.

but where is that parallel path..? , i just don't get it.

i'm new to this subject.

thank you.
 
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  • #2
download and print yourself a copy of this ..

http://www.reliance.com/mtr/mtrthrmn.htm

but be aware it is old - observe it uses CGS units, which is what i was initially taught.
So it may speak of current in 'wrong direction', ie direction of electron drift.
Decades ago practical electricity was taught that way, current flow from negative to positive..
Very early transistor manuals cautioned engineers to be careful and think in terms of their conventional textbook current, not the practical electron flow many of us used in vacuum tube days. In vacuum tubes you see, electrons physically leave the negative cathode and arrive at the positive anode. So we traced them on around the circuit that direction, as if they were "charge".

So his "left hand rule" will be your "right hand rule".
In my day one needed to be fluent in both schools of thought. My technicians teased me about "engineer's current" versus "real current". They'd indicate the direction of their "real" current with green arrows, and my "engineer's " current with brown ones, obviously...

We had a lot of fun.

But i digress. Sorry.

old jim
 
  • #3
in the link it says the same thing that in lap winding the number of parallel path are equal to the number of poles, and in wave winding its always two.

but I am unable to locate or find the parallel path in both cases.

it's very much confusing for me to find.
 

Related to Parallel path in lap and wave winding

What is a parallel path in lap and wave winding?

A parallel path in lap and wave winding is a type of armature winding in which the conductors are divided into two parallel paths, with each path having half of the total number of conductors. This allows for a more efficient flow of current and reduces the overall resistance of the winding.

What is the difference between lap and wave winding?

The main difference between lap and wave winding is the way in which the conductors are connected. In lap winding, the beginning and end of each conductor are connected to the adjacent conductors, forming a series circuit. In wave winding, the beginning and end of each conductor are connected to opposite points in the winding, creating a parallel circuit.

What are the advantages of using a parallel path in lap and wave winding?

There are several advantages to using a parallel path in lap and wave winding. These include reduced resistance, increased current carrying capacity, and better distribution of current in the winding. This results in improved performance and efficiency of the motor or generator.

What are the applications of parallel path in lap and wave winding?

Parallel path lap and wave winding are commonly used in DC motors and generators. They are also used in some AC motors, particularly those with high power requirements. These windings are suitable for machines that require a high starting torque and constant speed, such as cranes, elevators, and printing presses.

What factors should be considered when choosing between lap and wave winding?

When choosing between lap and wave winding, factors such as the voltage and current requirements, speed and torque requirements, and the type of machine being used should be considered. Lap winding is generally used for low voltage and high current applications, while wave winding is better suited for high voltage and low current applications.

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