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Parallel path in lap and wave winding

  1. Mar 23, 2014 #1
    i know that in lap winding the number of parallel path are equal to the number of poles, and in wave winding its always two.

    but where is that parallel path..? , i just don't get it.

    i'm new to this subject.

    thank you.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 24, 2014 #2

    jim hardy

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    2016 Award

    download and print yourself a copy of this ..

    http://www.reliance.com/mtr/mtrthrmn.htm

    but be aware it is old - observe it uses CGS units, which is what i was initially taught.
    So it may speak of current in 'wrong direction', ie direction of electron drift.
    Decades ago practical electricity was taught that way, current flow from negative to positive..
    Very early transistor manuals cautioned engineers to be careful and think in terms of their conventional textbook current, not the practical electron flow many of us used in vacuum tube days. In vacuum tubes you see, electrons physically leave the negative cathode and arrive at the positive anode. So we traced them on around the circuit that direction, as if they were "charge".

    So his "left hand rule" will be your "right hand rule".
    In my day one needed to be fluent in both schools of thought. My technicians teased me about "engineer's current" versus "real current". They'd indicate the direction of their "real" current with green arrows, and my "engineer's " current with brown ones, obviously....

    We had a lot of fun.

    But i digress. Sorry.

    old jim
     
  4. Mar 26, 2014 #3
    in the link it says the same thing that in lap winding the number of parallel path are equal to the number of poles, and in wave winding its always two.

    but im unable to locate or find the parallel path in both cases.

    it's very much confusing for me to find.
     
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