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Peak impact force of a falling object

  1. Oct 18, 2013 #1
    Hi there,

    I'm trying to work out how much force is produced if a climber was to fall onto a rope.

    I do realize that it would depend on the rope and whether it stretched or not but for this case lets just say it does not have any give in it.

    If I use the example of a climb who weighs 80kg, he falls 8m and takes 1.5 seconds can we/I work out the force which is felt?

    With my research I have found out that...
    Force = Mass X Acceleration
    Velocity/ Speed = Distance / Time
    Kinetic energy = .5(Mass (Velocity X Velocity))

    Can somebody please help me put it all together please??





    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data



    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 18, 2013 #2

    tiny-tim

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    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Hi Cornish30! Welcome to PF! :smile:

    What level are you at?

    Have you done the work-energy theorem?

    The force required to stop someone depends on how long in time it takes to stop them, or what distance it takes to stop them …

    the more time (or distance) available, the less the force needed. :wink:
     
  4. Oct 18, 2013 #3
    I'm not a school or college just trying to get a better understanding for my work.

    Work-energy theorm!?

    All I would like to be able to do is work out how much fore someone or a piece of equipment would feel if they were to fall and suddenly stop.

    I know there are lot's of variables but if I know the equations then I can work out different falls.

    Does that make sense?
     
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