Peanut-shaped near-Earth asteroid imaged by radar

  • Thread starter Spinnor
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Spinnor

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Why is the brightest part of the asteroid radar image below the upper edges?

PIA19647_940x464.jpg


From,

http://astronomynow.com/2015/08/03/peanut-shaped-near-earth-asteroid-1999jd6-imaged-by-radar/

Is it a software effect? I would naively think that the greatest radar intensity would be reflected from the parts of the asteroid nearly perpendicular to our view. A Google image search shows a similar trend.

https://www.google.com/search?safe=off&hl=en&site=imghp&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1360&bih=649&q=radar+images+of+asteroids&oq=radar+images+of+as&gs_l=img.1.0.0i24.2772.7655.0.10195.18.13.0.5.5.0.88.851.13.13.0....0...1ac.1.64.img..0.18.879.Clm93sqRtmU
 

DaveC426913

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Well, for starters, the radar emitter and receiver are in different locations.
 

Spinnor

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Well, for starters, the radar emitter and receiver are in different locations.
Right, but at the distance to the asteroid, the angle formed by the emitter, reflector, and absorber is nearly zero?
 

DaveC426913

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Yeah. It was a reach. :biggrin:

I'll bet that we are seeing solar EM radiation in the radar range.
 

RaulTheUCSCSlug

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Looks more like a dumbbell then a peanut :biggrin: and well could it be due to something like a Doppler shift?

Edit: Nevermind I don't think it would make much sense since the radar emitter is the one emitting the rays, not the asteroid... right? Unless the asteroid is emitting radiation as well.
 

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