Percent error using acceleration and 1/mass

In summary, the conversation discusses a lab where a cart and pulley were used to collect data on net force and acceleration. The acceleration vs mass graph showed a curve, which was straightened out to create a graph of acceleration vs 1/mass. The individual is seeking guidance on finding their accepted value for use in their percent error equation and is informed that the slope on the graph should be equal to the force used in the experiment.
  • #1
mjohnston2
2
0
I'm doing a lab where I had to use a cart and a pully, collecting data to compare the net force and the acceleration and again for acceleration vs mass. The acceleration vs mass graph was a curve, which we then straightened out to give us a graph of acceleration vs 1/mass. I am wondering how i would go about to find my accepted value to use in my percent error equation. thank you ahead of time :)
 
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  • #2
Welcome to PF, mj.
Since F = ma, a = F*1/m.
Comparing that with good old y = mx + b, the slope on the a vs 1/m graph should be F.
I trust you used the same force for all the data points. The force you used is your "accepted value" for the slope.
 
  • #3
Delphi51 said:
Welcome to PF, mj.
Since F = ma, a = F*1/m.
Comparing that with good old y = mx + b, the slope on the a vs 1/m graph should be F.
I trust you used the same force for all the data points. The force you used is your "accepted value" for the slope.

YES ! i totally understand :) my slope is in Newtons so it would turn out to be F ! Thank you !
 

1. What is percent error and how is it calculated?

Percent error is a measure of the accuracy of a measurement or calculation. It is calculated by taking the absolute value of the difference between the measured or calculated value and the accepted value, dividing it by the accepted value, and then multiplying by 100. The formula for percent error is: percent error = |(measured/calculated value - accepted value)| / accepted value x 100.

2. How is acceleration measured and what units is it expressed in?

Acceleration is a measure of how quickly the velocity of an object changes. It is measured in meters per second squared (m/s^2) and can be calculated by dividing the change in velocity by the change in time. It can be measured using various instruments, such as accelerometers or motion sensors.

3. How does acceleration affect the percent error in a measurement?

Acceleration can affect the percent error in a measurement by either increasing or decreasing it. If the acceleration is high, it can lead to a larger percent error as the change in velocity will be greater and can result in a larger difference between the measured value and the accepted value. On the other hand, if the acceleration is low, the percent error may be smaller as the change in velocity will be smaller and the measured value may be closer to the accepted value.

4. How does mass influence the percent error in a calculation involving acceleration?

The mass of an object can also affect the percent error in a calculation involving acceleration. A higher mass can result in a larger percent error as it requires more force to accelerate the object and can lead to a larger difference between the calculated and accepted values. On the other hand, a lower mass may result in a smaller percent error as it requires less force and can lead to a smaller difference between the calculated and accepted values.

5. What are some sources of error when calculating percent error using acceleration and mass?

There are several sources of error when calculating percent error using acceleration and mass. These can include human error in taking measurements or recording data, equipment limitations or errors, and external factors such as friction or air resistance that can affect the accuracy of the measurement. It is important to identify and minimize these sources of error in order to obtain a more accurate result.

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