Physics And Economics Double Major

In summary, the conversation discusses whether combining a degree in physics with economics is a good idea for job security and future prospects. The general consensus is that economics may not be necessary for a career in physics, and that self-study may be a better option for gaining knowledge in the subject. Additionally, having a degree in mathematics may be more beneficial for entry into physics. Ultimately, the purpose of a degree in economics is seen as primarily for obtaining a job, rather than for gaining knowledge.
  • #1
dpa
147
0
Hi all,

How good/bad an idea is that. I love physics and want to get a phd later but stll want to remain safe. any advice? Is physics+economics bad idea?
What about physics major and eco minor only?
:confused:
DPA
 
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  • #2
I´m doing theoretical economics major now, and very good education seems to be major in mathematics and minor in economics(or econometrics/statistics). Physics is of very limited use in economics, while mathematics makes it a lot easier. Degree in maths would obviously make entry to physics better, if you decide so.

Don´t do economics if you only want it for your resume. I can guarantee if you force yourself to go through it, you will forget everything very soon. It takes considerable effort to make sense of economics.

Also, both czech prime minister and german kanzlerin are physicists by education!
 
  • #3
ahh! No interest in politics.
Any more opinions?

And its totally not for mere resume. Its like if i sometimes want a job and not merely be a thinker.
 
  • #4
Undergraduate education in economics is pretty much rubbish. A BS in Math, or also BS in Physics will be a good background. However, if you can take Econ courses, take graduate courses in Econ.
 
  • #5
dpa said:
How good/bad an idea is that. I love physics and want to get a phd later but stll want to remain safe. any advice? Is physics+economics bad idea?

It's pretty useless. If you have a Ph.D. in physics and get a job in finance, you are expected to be able to learn the economics on your own, and I agree with Pyrrhus that undergraduate economics is pretty much rubbish.

The other thing is that economics is one of those things that you might do better learning if you just audit classes and read books on your own. Remember that the purpose of the degree is merely to get a piece of paper that gets you a job, and if already have that and just want some knowledge, there are cheaper ways of getting that.
 
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Related to Physics And Economics Double Major

1. What is a "Physics and Economics Double Major"?

A "Physics and Economics Double Major" is an academic program in which a student earns a degree in both physics and economics. This means that the student takes classes in both fields and meets the requirements for both degrees.

2. What is the benefit of pursuing a Physics and Economics double major?

There are several benefits to pursuing a double major in physics and economics. First, it allows for a more well-rounded education and the ability to apply knowledge from both fields to real-world problems. It also opens up more career opportunities, as the combination of these two disciplines is highly sought after in many industries.

3. Is it difficult to balance the workload of a Physics and Economics double major?

Balancing the workload of a double major can be challenging, but it is doable with proper time management and organization. Both fields require a significant amount of time and effort, so it is important to plan ahead and prioritize tasks to ensure success in both areas.

4. What career options are available with a Physics and Economics double major?

The combination of physics and economics can lead to a variety of career options, such as working in finance, consulting, data analysis, or research. Graduates with this double major are highly sought after in industries such as renewable energy, technology, and healthcare.

5. Can I pursue a Physics and Economics double major if I do not have a strong background in both subjects?

While having a strong foundation in both physics and economics can be helpful, it is not always necessary. Many universities offer introductory courses for students who have not taken these subjects before. With hard work and dedication, anyone can pursue a double major in physics and economics.

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