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Physics research outside academia?

  1. Dec 20, 2015 #1
    Wondering if somebody could help me.

    I'm in the 3rd year of a 4 year MPhys course and at the point where I am actively applying for placements/internships etc and thinking about what to do after university.

    I love physics don't get me wrong, but really don't fancy staying at uni for another 3/4 years to do a Ph.D. However, I do want to have a career in research and development where physics is a major contribution. Are there any companies where I could get a research based career with just a MPhys degree? I'm interested mainly in nuclear, atomic, solid state, laser physics. I'm also expecting to get a 1st class degree when I graduate.

    Thanks
    James
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 20, 2015 #2

    mfb

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    Europe, or somewhere else where a MSc is common?
    Many companies look for physicists for various research tasks. A PhD is rarely necessary, although experience in method X used by company Y can help a lot. Industrial research is more product-oriented, of course.
     
  4. Dec 21, 2015 #3

    DrClaude

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    There is also the possibility of doing your Ph.D. in industry.
     
  5. Dec 21, 2015 #4
    What sort of companies offer these if you know of any?
     
  6. Dec 21, 2015 #5

    symbolipoint

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    WHAT? An industry or company that grants advanced degrees to students or employees?
     
  7. Dec 21, 2015 #6

    DrClaude

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    No... Industrial Ph.D.s are granted by universities, but for research mostly done in industry. What happens most often is that one gets two supervisors, one at the university and the other at the company. It is not all that common yet, but in my corner of the world we are getting lots of incentive to do things like this, to bridge academia with industry.

    They usually are big companies, with a substantial R&D department. Although I know some people working with a smaller company, doing numerical simulations (the expertise on the simulations comes from the university, but the problem is applied to the work of the company).

    This kind of Ph.D. probably works best if you can find an existing link that a university researcher has with a company.
     
  8. Dec 21, 2015 #7

    symbolipoint

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    Nice description and nice idea.
     
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