Point source (radioactive)that emits 100 gamma per second

In summary, the question being discussed is whether placing a metal or foil (such as Al) in front of a point source emitting 100 gammas per second will reduce the number of gammas. This reduction depends on the attenuation coefficient, which can be calculated using the Beer-Lambert law. However, the concept of intensity vs. number of gamma quanta can cause confusion. Additionally, the attenuation coefficient can either apply to the incident photon only or to any photon of any energy coming out of the attenuator. There are also situations where attenuation may not reduce the number of gammas, such as when a single high energy gamma creates an electron positron pair, which then produces two annihilation gammas. Exposure rate is also mentioned as
  • #1
Rajini
621
4
Hi all,
i have a critical question.
You have a point source (radioactive)..that emits 100 gamma per second. Now if you place a metal or foil (e.g., Al)..will the no. of gamma reduces? If it reduces how to calculate..based on beer law..(if we know the attenuation coefficient of that metal and the energy of that 100 gamma)..sometimes i get confused with intensity and number of gamma quanta.
thanks for your reply
 
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  • #2


it depends on the attenuation coefficient, if it is the total (i.e integrated over energy and all processes (pairproduction etc))
 
  • #3


so no. of gamma quanta would decrease depending on the attenuation coefficient?
thanks
 
  • #4


Rajini said:
so no. of gamma quanta would decrease depending on the attenuation coefficient?
thanks

depends on if you have integrated atten coeff over energy etc
 
  • #5


There are situations where a single high energy gamma from a radioactive source creates an electron positron pair, which in turn produces two annihilation gammas. So no, the attenuation does not always reduce the number of gammas. angstar is right, the attenuation coefficient can either apply either to the incident photon only, or to any photon of any energy comming out of the attenuator.
Bob S
 
  • #6


okay..something with exposure rate!..
 

Related to Point source (radioactive)that emits 100 gamma per second

1. What is a point source that emits 100 gamma per second?

A point source that emits 100 gamma per second refers to a radioactive material or object that releases 100 gamma rays (a type of high-energy electromagnetic radiation) every second from a single point.

2. How is the emission rate of 100 gamma per second determined?

The emission rate of 100 gamma per second is determined by measuring the number of gamma rays emitted from the point source over a period of one second. This can be done using specialized equipment such as a gamma ray detector.

3. What are the potential hazards associated with a point source emitting 100 gamma per second?

A point source emitting 100 gamma per second can pose a potential health hazard due to its high level of radiation. Exposure to gamma rays can damage cells and tissues in the body, leading to increased risk of cancer and other health problems.

4. How can the emission rate of 100 gamma per second be reduced?

The emission rate of 100 gamma per second can be reduced by implementing proper safety measures and protocols, such as using shielding materials to limit the spread of radiation, and minimizing the time spent in close proximity to the point source.

5. What precautions should be taken when working with a point source emitting 100 gamma per second?

When working with a point source emitting 100 gamma per second, it is important to wear appropriate protective gear, such as lead aprons and gloves, to limit exposure to radiation. It is also crucial to follow strict safety procedures and to regularly monitor and maintain the point source to ensure safe handling.

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