Potential Iron Pill Overdose

  1. I have seen that the recommended daily intake of iron for adults is 45 mg/day. I've seen even lower estimates. These iron pills that I bought contain 50 mg of iron and give 278% of your daily value intake. The instructions say take two tablets daily.

    Isn't this a bit extreme or am I not getting something?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Evo

    Staff: Mentor

    Why are you taking iron supplements? Have you been tested as anemic and advised to take supplements by a doctor?

    The recommended daily intake of iron for males age 19 to 50 years is only 8 mg. This is easily obtained from a balanced diet.

    The body excretes very little iron, please see a doctor. The upper limit for iron is 45mg per day, and again, such supplements should only be under a doctor's supervision when medically necessary. See table 5.

    See table 3 http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Iron-HealthProfessional/
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2013
  4. SteamKing

    SteamKing 9,169
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    A good leeching can get rid of excess iron.
     
  5. What do you mean by "leeching"? Do you mean chelation therapy?

    http://www.aamds.org/node/114
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2013
  6. SteamKing

    SteamKing 9,169
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    No, I mean putting actual leeches on your body, like they used to do. Bloodsuckers, ya know.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leech

    Leeches also produce a powerful natural anticoagulant. They were studied and used experimentally in the 1980s to aid in microsurgery used to reattach body parts. If you want to get rid of excess iron, take a couple of leeches and call your doctor in the morning.
     
  7. SteamKing

    SteamKing 9,169
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    Of course, if you don't like leeches, then you can get a phlebotomy (blood letting) on a regular basis.
     
  8. I thought you might mean that but was afraid to ask, not because it's bad (it's an approved treatment) but because I didn't know how you felt about such things.
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2013
  9. SteamKing

    SteamKing 9,169
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    They're leeches, you know. I can take 'em or leave 'em ... or leave 'em ... dang it ... or leave 'em.
     
  10. Apparently, according to WebMD.com, the average person only absorbs 10% of ingested iron, while people with hemochromatosis can absorb up to 30%, which can cause iron poisoning.

    I have poor diverse food intake and wake up groggy even after more than 8 hours of sleep. I can sleep for 12 hours sometimes. I figured that iron would lower my fatigue.
     
  11. Evo

    Staff: Mentor

    Too much iron *causes* fatigue. Don't self diagnose, please get checked by a doctor.
     
  12. strangerep

    strangerep 2,149
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    Adding to what Evo said... if you need more encouragement to go see a doctor then read up a bit more about haemochromatosis:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haemochromatosis

    Iron overload gradually causes damages to various other major organs (heart, liver, pancreas, to name a few).

    (I'm not saying this is necessarily what's wrong with you -- there's lots of other things than could cause fatigue, e.g., liver cirrhosis if your username "Vodkacannon" indicates your actual drinking habits. You need to get a professional diagnosis sooner rather than later.)
     
  13. a chelating therapy would overall decrease the symptoms of iron toxicity Deferoxamine and now a new with very less side effects Deferasirox can be used.
    note: all these are generic names.
     
  14. strangerep

    strangerep 2,149
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    According to Wikipedia, Deferasirox is not risk-free, and has a rather large question mark hanging over its use.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deferasirox
    See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deferoxamine

    Chelation therapy in general sounds like something not to be undertaken lightly:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chelation_therapy
     
  15. Evo

    Staff: Mentor

    From what I've been reading, it appears that chelation therapy is the last resort.
     
  16. you have not focussed , that deferasirox is approved by FDA in 2005.also the symptoms of iron toxicity in acute condition like vomit.,diarrhoea,pain abdomen,coma are much more severe than its side efeects especially in developing countries but not in developed nations.
    also note that deferoxamine causes nephrotoxicity as it is excreted in yrine but deferasirox is excreted in bile
    so no chance of nephrotoxicity but it causes liver and gastric haemorrhage only in high doses administered !
     
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