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Proving Centripetal Acceleration Physically?

  1. Jan 26, 2015 #1
    How Can I Prove this Physically

    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    So I need to do a project where I prove centripetal acceleration. All the cases I've seen of where it's proved is using formulas, though I need an actual project.

    By an actual project I mean something like http://jedlik.phy.bme.hu/~hartlein/www.mip.berkeley.edu/images/physics/A+0+47.gif

    Does anybody know how I can prove centripetal acceleration with a physical project behind it?
    Yes it can involve forumlas, equations also. Though I still need a project for it.

    2. Relevant equations
    a = v^2/r


    3. The attempt at a solution
    Bucket of water - No way of proving so far.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 27, 2015 #2

    Stephen Tashi

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    If you school doesn't have lab equipment for studying centripetal acceleration and force, you could build it: http://www.physics.fsu.edu/users/ng/Courses/phy2053c/Labs/Expt03a/Expt03a-3.htm [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  4. Jan 27, 2015 #3
    I'm looking for something a bit simpler, thanks though :)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  5. Jan 27, 2015 #4

    BvU

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    Carousel swing
    Some other rotating object on a playground
    Simple pendulum: weight hanging from a wire describing circles.
     
  6. Jan 27, 2015 #5
    Why isn't the bucket thing working? Hold a small bucket of water upside down, the water falls. Rotate it, the water doesn't fall.
     
  7. Jan 27, 2015 #6

    BvU

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    Turning the bucket thing into a physics learning experience (something to hypothesize, something to measure, something to evaluate) project worth a marking is hard (and wet).
     
  8. Jan 27, 2015 #7
    Haha! It might get a bit wet, yes. But it you can get a small bucket, its pretty much feasible.
     
  9. Jan 27, 2015 #8

    BvU

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    HTHL, do you have something available that rotates at a reasonable speed ? Lego with a little motor, meccano (Ha, mid 20th century -- shows my age :( ), ceiling fan ?
    Anything resembling a carousel swing.
    Hang a little weight from a wire and measure the angle as a function of rpm, radius, weight, wire length, time of day, etc.... Real physics for you !
    How to measure accurately ? Another physics challenge! (although with these thingies nowadays..)
    And if you insist on getting wet: angle of liquid in a bucket on a turntable in the playground ! As a function of rpm, radius, temperature,
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2015
  10. Jan 27, 2015 #9
    Thanks for the answer! :)
    Using a turntable on the playground is actually a good idea to measure the speed, thank you for that!
     
  11. Jan 27, 2015 #10
    Measure the speed at which the the kids get thrown off the carousel :-p
     
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