Quantization of EM in UV & vacuum

In summary, the UV catastrophe did not occur because the electromagnetic (em) waves are quantized, meaning the higher frequency modes were not present. However, when computing the contribution of the em modes in vacuum, it is 120 times greater than what is observed. The mystery lies in why this is not the case, and it is theorized that it is simply canceled out. But why didn't they propose that the em is quantized in the vacuum, similar to the UV catastrophe? According to quantum field theory, there is a possibility of assigning an energy density to the vacuum, but it is not necessarily relevant to our world. The only potential impact would be through general relativity, which is still an unresolved issue. Without quantization,
  • #1
130
0
UV catastrophe didn't occur because em are quantized.. so the higher frequency modes were not there. In vacuum.. if you compute the contribution of the em modes, it is 120 magnitude greater than observed.. the mystery is why it is not and they theorize it is just canceled out. But why didn't they just propose the em is quantized and so the contribution of the em modes didn't occur in the vacuum just like in the UV catastrophe?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Edward Wij said:
if you compute the contribution of the em modes, it is 120 magnitude greater than observed.
It is not.
Based on quantum field theory, there is a possible way to assign something like an energy density to the vacuum in a way that leads to a huge value. There is no special reason to assume that value has any relevance for our world, however. The only way it could influence our world (if at all) is via general relativity, and the unification of this with quantum field theory is an open problem on its own.
All this does not happen at all without quantization, so asking why it is not quantized does not make sense.
 

1. What is quantization of electromagnetic radiation in the ultraviolet (UV) region and vacuum?

Quantization of electromagnetic (EM) radiation refers to the phenomenon where EM radiation can only exist in discrete, quantized energy levels rather than continuously. In the UV region and vacuum, the EM radiation has a shorter wavelength and higher energy, which leads to a more pronounced effect of quantization.

2. How does quantization of EM radiation in UV differ from other regions?

The quantization of EM radiation is a universal phenomenon, but it becomes more apparent in the UV region due to the higher energy levels. In vacuum, there is no matter or medium to interact with the EM radiation, making its quantization more evident.

3. What is the significance of quantization in UV and vacuum?

The quantization of EM radiation in the UV region and vacuum has significant implications in various fields such as quantum mechanics, astrophysics, and quantum optics. It helps explain phenomena such as the photoelectric effect, blackbody radiation, and the behavior of atoms and molecules in the presence of EM radiation.

4. How is quantization of EM radiation in UV and vacuum measured?

The quantization of EM radiation in UV and vacuum is usually measured using spectroscopy techniques, such as absorption and emission spectroscopy. These techniques allow scientists to study the energy levels of EM radiation and determine the discrete energy levels present in a given system.

5. Can the quantization of EM radiation in UV and vacuum be observed in everyday life?

While the effects of quantization are not noticeable in our daily lives, they play a crucial role in many technological applications. For example, the quantization of EM radiation in UV and vacuum is essential in the development of devices such as lasers, solar cells, and photodetectors.

Suggested for: Quantization of EM in UV & vacuum

2
Replies
42
Views
2K
Replies
10
Views
764
Replies
10
Views
790
Replies
7
Views
578
Replies
18
Views
977
Replies
16
Views
579
Replies
65
Views
3K
Replies
18
Views
795
Back
Top