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Question for students or graduates in physics from the U.S?

  1. Jun 11, 2012 #1
    Question for students or graduates in physics from the U.S???

    Hi, i am planning to go to a university in Canada (live their) and with the grades that i have know, it seems I'll get into each one (safety school) i apply (in Canada they only care about grades). I was planning to go to graduate school in a prestigious university in america when i get older, i hear allot that the university you go to for your undergrad matters when applying for graduate school. So i was just wondering, where you live, which Canadian university is talked about most or is the most famous or is regarded as the most prestigious out of these 3. McGill University in Montreal, University of Toronto, Waterloo University

    Thanks for the opinions
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 11, 2012 #2
    Re: Question for students or graduates in physics from the U.S???

    I don't think any of the three schools would give you a particular advantage/disadvantage for grad school admission
     
  4. Jun 11, 2012 #3
    Re: Question for students or graduates in physics from the U.S???

    Why is that, Ans426???

    Is it because all three of them are so poorly known in the area you live :frown: or because you don't think that where you go to for your undergrad matters for graduate school. :confused:
     
  5. Jun 11, 2012 #4
    Re: Question for students or graduates in physics from the U.S???

    Why is that, Ans426???

    Is it because all three of them are so poorly known in the area you live :frown: or because you don't think that where you go to for your undergrad matters for graduate school. :confused:
     
  6. Jun 11, 2012 #5
    Re: Question for students or graduates in physics from the U.S???

    All three schools have a decent track of sending their graduates to top schools..
    And as long as you do well I don't think going to any particular one out of the three will make too much of a difference
     
  7. Jun 12, 2012 #6
    Re: Question for students or graduates in physics from the U.S???

    Doing well in a university is far far far more important than how prestigious the school is that you go to. Go to the university that is within your financial means, is in an area you like, has a Physics program that you want to be a part of. Enjoy your time at the university and focus on the task at hand instead of focusing on something that's at least 4 years in the future.

    To answer your question though, the one that I have heard of (don't remember the context) was University of Toronto. That being said, I know nothing of their program or their prestige as I have not researched universities outside of the US (I suppose I should one of these days).

    P.S. I am currently an undergraduate in Physics.
     
  8. Jun 12, 2012 #7
    Re: Question for students or graduates in physics from the U.S???

    From what I gather, all three are quite reputed and you should be fine, as far as reputation is concerned. Make the most of the resources available to you. The PF members who've gone to grad school or have the intention of going have often said that prestige, in the conventional sense at least, does not matter that much for physics and math grad school.

    Also:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Grothendieck (note that he did have some great guidance though - from what I gather)
     
  9. Jun 12, 2012 #8
    Re: Question for students or graduates in physics from the U.S???

    Those are all good universities. It will make no difference in terms of getting into grad school which one you attend. Attend whichever one is most beneficial to your professional development or easier to attend.
     
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