Question regarding computer science....

In summary: I would not call myself a physicist. I have taken a few physics courses since then, but they have been more in-depth and less math-intensive. So, if you are passionate about computer science and feel like you can improve, then you should pursue it. If you are just interested in the subject for the sake of learning it, then a different course might be more appropriate for you. Thanks for your feedback.
  • #1
sankalpmittal
785
15
I would very much appreciate if you could shed some of your insight on the following question that has been troubling me.

I faced difficulty in computer programming as many times I could not find logic for even a simple problem (which many other classmates would do easily) while in some cases I could write programs for even some difficult problems (which some of my classmates could not do). For many of my classmates, programming was very easy, but for me it was difficult (especially incorporating the correct logic or steps in pseudo code involved in a given program; even if it were correct, it wasn't that efficient).

Now here is where my dilemma starts. Many say computer programming is about "natural instinct" and I think I can improve myself through hard work. Am I right?

Please help!

Thanks in advance...
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
You are correct - many people do say that computer programming is about natural instinct and you can improve yourself with hard work.

Your talent lies where you find something easy that all those around you find difficult - especially if it is hard to see why everyone else finds it difficult.
A side effect of this is that education is geared towards people with less talent in the field - so the earlier, simpler, learning tasks may be difficult for you.
Those tasks are designed to build an intuition or good work-habits that everyone else does not have.

OTOH: it could just be that some kinds of programming is difficult for you and other kinds easy :)
 
  • #3
So should I opt for computer science? I mean its not only about programming right? I do understand syntax etc of a given programming language. Only problem is application which I often faced as a student of science. I find myself stuck at many programs and others were adept at making them. Also if I can make logic successfully its declared to be inefficient or rather lengthy even if it was correct. So should I opt for it hoping to improve it by practice or hardwork?

Thanks again.
 
  • #4
sankalpmittal said:
I would very much appreciate if you could shed some of your insight on the following question that has been troubling me.

I faced difficulty in computer programming as many times I could not find logic for even a simple problem (which many other classmates would do easily) while in some cases I could write programs for even some difficult problems (which some of my classmates could not do). For many of my classmates, programming was very easy, but for me it was difficult (especially incorporating the correct logic or steps in pseudo code involved in a given program; even if it were correct, it wasn't that efficient).

Now here is where my dilemma starts. Many say computer programming is about "natural instinct" and I think I can improve myself through hard work. Am I right?

Please help!

Thanks in advance...
Analysis of process and logic. Hhelll NOT natural instinct!
 
  • #5
sankalpmittal said:
So should I opt for computer science? I mean its not only about programming right? I do understand syntax etc of a given programming language. Only problem is application which I often faced as a student of science. I find myself stuck at many programs and others were adept at making them. Also if I can make logic successfully its declared to be inefficient or rather lengthy even if it was correct. So should I opt for it hoping to improve it by practice or hardwork?

Thanks again.
The basic conclusion is correct. Hard work and practice. Trying to earn course credit is a different goal than finding and developing applications for yourself or for others or for your own curiosity & development.
 
  • #6
symbolipoint said:
Analysis of process and logic. Hhelll NOT natural instinct!
It is possible for someone to have an instinct for analysis of process and logic and a "feel" for programming.

sankalpmittal said:
So should I opt for computer science?
Only you can answer that question.

You should check the more advanced course options offered at your college to see what the computer science course involves there.
Most people find they struggle with some aspects of any course they are on - the key is usually if you are passionate about the subject.
 
  • #7
symbolipoint said:
Analysis of process and logic. Hhelll NOT natural instinct!
Simon Bridge said:
It is possible for someone to have an instinct for analysis of process and logic and a "feel" for programming.
...

Okay, that is very possible. Learning to analyze and formulate logical processes is something that a person can accomplish with hard work. Your point is supportable. The first REAL Physics course (mostly mechanics as in Physics 1 of the typical lower division series) was a big struggle for me. The result was that I became better at learning to analyze, draw diagrams, form equations, and then trust my algebra to solve problems. I still have this kind of skill today.
 
  • #8
Thank you both for your replies...
 

Related to Question regarding computer science....

What is computer science?

Computer science is the study of computers and computational systems. It involves understanding how computers work, how they can be used to solve problems, and how they impact society.

What are the different subfields of computer science?

Some common subfields of computer science include programming, artificial intelligence, data science, computer engineering, and human-computer interaction. Other subfields include software engineering, computer graphics, and computer security.

What skills are important for a computer scientist?

Some important skills for a computer scientist include problem-solving, critical thinking, and strong analytical skills. Additionally, having a strong understanding of various programming languages, algorithms, and data structures is crucial.

What career opportunities are available in computer science?

There are many career opportunities available in computer science, including software developer, data analyst, computer systems analyst, computer network architect, and computer and information research scientist. Other careers in computer science include web developer, database administrator, and information security analyst.

How can I get started learning computer science?

There are many resources available for learning computer science, such as online courses, books, and coding bootcamps. It's important to start with the basics and gradually build your knowledge and skills. You can also join online communities or attend local meetups to connect with other computer science enthusiasts and learn from their experiences.

Similar threads

  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
6
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
13
Views
3K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
12
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
10
Views
2K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
8
Views
1K
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
6
Views
3K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
6
Views
1K
Replies
19
Views
2K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
1
Views
1K
Back
Top