Question regarding "Insect Apocalypse" (1 Viewer)

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I think that all happens due to a fault of humans, as we ruin the ecology
We are part the ecology, we are part of the biosphere.
 
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I always get a little irritated when I see words like Apocalypse and Armageddon used in articles, particularly when linked to ecology. The first thing to consider is the quality of the evidence, which isn't really that impressive, its suggested that we have only identified around a fifth of the species and we have very poor baseline data. One of the problems in the study of insects is the degree of specialisation in some species, its likely that small environmental changes and shifts towards monoculture may have a massive effect on some species. I know people have outlined their own experiences but something I haven't seen is a mention of huge swarms of some insects, in the UK we were swamped with continental ladybirds last summer, which are of course predators. There have also been significant recovery of pollinator species despite attempts by some groups to use the decline to ban certain insecticides, with little evidence. This is one of those issues that need to be investigated properly without it drifting into other alarmist stories. I say this because if there really is a mass insect extinction taking place the effects that this would have on the ecosystem would make every other alarmist message irrelevant, the effect on agriculture really would make this a global disaster. The first link discusses some of the research and the second tries to bring a bit of realism to the discussion.
https://ecologyisnotadirtyword.com/2019/02/16/insectageddon-is-a-great-story-but-what-are-the-facts/
https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2019/02/insect-apocalypse-really-upon-us/583018/
 
I always get a little irritated when I see words like Apocalypse and Armageddon used in articles, particularly when linked to ecology. The first thing to consider is the quality of the evidence, which isn't really that impressive, its suggested that we have only identified around a fifth of the species and we have very poor baseline data. One of the problems in the study of insects is the degree of specialisation in some species, its likely that small environmental changes and shifts towards monoculture may have a massive effect on some species. I know people have outlined their own experiences but something I haven't seen is a mention of huge swarms of some insects, in the UK we were swamped with continental ladybirds last summer, which are of course predators. There have also been significant recovery of pollinator species despite attempts by some groups to use the decline to ban certain insecticides, with little evidence. This is one of those issues that need to be investigated properly without it drifting into other alarmist stories. I say this because if there really is a mass insect extinction taking place the effects that this would have on the ecosystem would make every other alarmist message irrelevant, the effect on agriculture really would make this a global disaster. The first link discusses some of the research and the second tries to bring a bit of realism to the discussion.
https://ecologyisnotadirtyword.com/2019/02/16/insectageddon-is-a-great-story-but-what-are-the-facts/
https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2019/02/insect-apocalypse-really-upon-us/583018/
Healthy skeptisicm is a good thing.
Adding too many grains of salt or attempting to find an angle doesn't work out too well. For example, as testing of substances go it is not smart to think any effect is really unimpactful if the usage is very high.

Lack of data is not an excuse, it should be an invitation!

Thanks for those articles.
 
I live in a very buggy area in North Carolina... actually the entire state is pretty buggy. But over the past two years I've noticed the total bug count plummeting. We used to have large numbers of butterflies, of 7-8 species. Now each summer day, maybe 2-3 individuals. Used to be, bumble bees, carpenter bees, honey bees, ground-dwelling bees, yellow jackets, paper wasps & mud daubers in abundance. Now? This past year, only one colony of any such social insects.

Ants are down, as are dragon flies and damsel flies. Amazingly, no more mosquitos! And even though I have lots of deer on the property, only 1-2 deer ticks, the entire season. We used to be covered in them. Also used to have many spiders of all sorts. Now hardly a one. Nor moths, nor millipedes, nor daddy longlegs. Naturally our frogs, box turtles, skinks, anoles and geckos have also disappeared. All were abundant 3 years ago.

Nothing has changed as far as neighbors spraying for insects. If anything, we have fewer farms around than previously. The only significant change in the environment has been the conversion of wooded areas and old farms into newly landscaped developments. So the only guess I can make is habitat loss. It's very disturbing, and I wonder if others living in rural areas being converted into suburbs are seeing the same thing.
 

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