Quick question on universal gravitation - I think I'm right - need clarifica

In summary, when an object's mass is doubled and its distance from the center of the Earth is also doubled, its weight will be halved. This is because the force of gravity is inversely proportional to the square of the distance between the two objects. Therefore, the correct answer to the question is option c) The weight would be cut in half.
  • #1
82
0
[SOLVED] Quick question on universal gravitation - I think I'm right - need clarifica

Homework Statement



What would happen to the weight of an object if its mass was doubled while its distance from the center of the Earth was also doubled?
a) The weight would double.
b) The weight would be quadrupled.
c) The weight would be cut in half.
d) The weight would be unchanged.

Homework Equations


F=Gm1m2/d^2


The Attempt at a Solution



F_new=2(Gm1m2)/(2^2)r^2
F_new=2/4=1/2

Therefore, the weight would be halved. (C)

Am I right in how I figured this out? I only have one chance to get this problem right, so I wanted to make sure the way I'm doing this is correct.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
That's exactly right.
 
  • #3
Looks good to me!
 
  • #4
Thanks, I got the problem right...if someone could lock this that would be nice.
 

1. What is universal gravitation?

Universal gravitation is a fundamental force of nature that describes the attraction between any two objects with mass. It is responsible for the motion of planets around the sun, as well as the motion of objects on Earth.

2. How does universal gravitation work?

Universal gravitation is based on Isaac Newton's law of gravitation, which states that the force of attraction between two objects is directly proportional to their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. This means that the larger the masses of the objects and the closer they are, the stronger the gravitational force between them will be.

3. How is universal gravitation related to gravity on Earth?

Universal gravitation is the underlying principle behind gravity on Earth. The mass of the Earth creates a gravitational force that pulls objects towards its center. This force is what causes objects to fall towards the ground when dropped and keeps the moon in orbit around the Earth.

4. Are there any exceptions to universal gravitation?

Universal gravitation is a very accurate and well-tested theory, but it does have limitations. It does not fully explain the behavior of objects at very small scales, such as the subatomic level, or at very high speeds, such as those near the speed of light. In these cases, other theories, such as quantum mechanics and relativity, are needed to fully understand the behavior of particles.

5. How is universal gravitation important in modern science?

Universal gravitation is a crucial aspect of our understanding of the universe and is used in many fields of science, such as astronomy, physics, and engineering. It helps us understand the motion of celestial bodies, predict the paths of spacecraft, and even design structures on Earth. Without universal gravitation, many of our modern technologies and scientific advancements would not be possible.

Suggested for: Quick question on universal gravitation - I think I'm right - need clarifica

Back
Top