Radius of the electron and uncertainty

  • #1
IWantToLearn
93
0
i thought that electrons are merely abstract thing or statistical entities, so i mitigated every attempt to visualize them as something that has a shape like a sphere, has a radius, internal structure,
i thought that any attempt to measure a radius (if any) could result in uncertainty in measuring so we will never know actual radius
until i found a lecturer talking about that there is a radius and electron can be visualized as small ball!
What is wrong in my understanding?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Meselwulf
126
0
Yes, it can be a very small ball. Smaller than the classical electron now in fact.


And yes, Lloyd Motz has suggested that the radius and mass of a particle are effected by the uncertainty principle.
 
  • #3
IWantToLearn
93
0
Yes, it can be a very small ball. Smaller than the classical electron now in fact.

How come we can talk about shape!?, without talk about internal structure
i find difficulties in accepting this idea
i think we must migrate the idea of shape when talking about elementary particles which are almost point-like

And yes, Lloyd Motz has suggested that the radius and mass of a particle are effected by the uncertainty principle.

this is a support to my idea that we can't talk about anything like shape, volume, density, since all of these values that subject to the uncertainty principle
 
  • #4
Bill_K
Science Advisor
Insights Author
4,157
203
IWantToLearn, You are correct. An elementary particle like an electron is NOT a small ball. It's pointlike, which means its size (if it even has one) is too small to be observed.
 

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