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Reactivity of solutions with the same anion

  1. Jan 17, 2013 #1
    If I have two aqueous solutions of two different compounds (with different solubility) that result in equal amounts of the same anion, should the anion in those solutions have the same reactivity or not?

    An example:
    Solution A
    CaF2 (aq)

    Solution B
    NaF (aq)

    The solutions are prepared such that both contain the same amount of F-. Is F- more or less reactive in either of the solutions? Would it be dependent on the cations or solubility of the compound?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 18, 2013 #2

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    Before we will start to discuss details - what is your opinion? Per forum rules you should try to answer the question by yourself first.
     
  4. Jan 18, 2013 #3
    I'm leaning towards the idea that the reactivity would be different, perhaps due to the differing bond strengths in the compounds. Different cations in proximity to the anion would affect the anion's reactivity in ways particular to those species, despite both having been solvated.
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2013
  5. Jan 18, 2013 #4

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    Have you heard about ionic strength of the solution and activity coefficients? Debye-Hückel theory?
     
  6. Jan 27, 2013 #5
    CaF2 is practically insoluble in water.
     
  7. Jan 27, 2013 #6

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    Saturated CaF2 is something like 4x10-4 M in F-. Not much, but quite a reasonable concentration, easy to prepare.
     
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