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Reciprocating Compressor Experiment.

  1. Oct 23, 2013 #1
    So, I've recently carried out an experiment to find the volumetric efficiency of a singular reciprocating compressor. During the experiment, there are sub questions asking you to find the value of n and then whether the process is isothermal, poly tropic or adiabatic. Well, n is found to be very close to 1 so the process is isothermal. However, the temperature in the receiver (where the compressed gas is stored) does change by about 3K from t= 0s until t = 180s (when the compressor switches off). Why is that? And, is this therefore not an isothermal process? Or, am I just not properly understanding what's happening? Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 23, 2013 #2

    haruspex

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    From the information posted, it is not possible to tell whether the temperature change observed is small enough to be consistent with the measured difference between n and 1. You could try to compute that.
     
  4. Oct 23, 2013 #3
    The difference between n and 1? Well, the average value of n was found to be 1.034. So, the difference between n and 1 is 0.034. Is this what you're asking? I may have misunderstood.
     
  5. Oct 23, 2013 #4

    haruspex

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    Yes, that's what I was asking, but the next step is to determine whether the observed rise in temperature is within the range consistent with that n.
     
  6. Oct 23, 2013 #5
    How do I go about doing that? Only just began this module 3 weeks back so apologies if I'm catching on a bit slowly.
     
  7. Oct 23, 2013 #6

    haruspex

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    Not my area, I'm afraid. I was just pointing out a possible explanation.
     
  8. Oct 24, 2013 #7
    No problem. Thanks for the help.
     
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