Relationship between EMF and distance between the particles

In summary, quantum mechanics provides a better explanation for the H-atom, which disproves the Rutherford's model.
  • #1
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Hello.

One doubt.
How is the distance between the charged particles and the EMF between them get balanced out? That is, if I have a proton and electron, they attract each other, move towards each other and form a H atom. But going by this attractive force, they should approach each other such that the distance between them tends to be zero. And if this is the case, EMF would become infinite.
Since that doesn't happen, how the electron and the proton maintain & balance the distance between them?
 
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  • #2
The fail of the Rutherford's H-atom's model has been extensively discussed on these forums along the years. Use the search option to find the threads. In short, the electron and the proton are not to be seen nor mathematically described as 2 small electrically charged spheres with charges of opposite sign.

Quantum mechanics provides an exact description of the H-atom.
 
  • #3
werunom said:
Hello.

One doubt.
How is the distance between the charged particles and the EMF between them get balanced out? That is, if I have a proton and electron, they attract each other, move towards each other and form a H atom. But going by this attractive force, they should approach each other such that the distance between them tends to be zero. And if this is the case, EMF would become infinite.
Since that doesn't happen, how the electron and the proton maintain & balance the distance between them?

Please start by reading the FAQ thread in the General Physics forum. This is also not a "high energy physics" or "nuclear physics" question. This thread will be moved to a more appropriate forum.

Furthermore, you may want to spell out clearly what "EMF" stands for within the context of your usage. Please note that "EMF" as commonly used stands for "electromotive force".

Zz.
 
  • #4
@ZapperZ - Excuse. Will take care from future.

@bigubau - I searched this forum and tried even google; but no luck! Though, I got links related to Rutherford's model and its drawback, I am not able to find the answer to my question.
can you please point me to the resource or mention the reason in brief? I can pick up the trail from there.
Edited -
Paraphrasing my doubt - how the distance between two charged particles get balanced out? As we know, electromagnetic force [EMF] is of infinite range - it just becomes weaker, but not zero. So, if there is an electron and a proton, both would get attracted towards each other. but it never happens that the distance between them becomes zero.
If that is the case, and EMF = (the product of the charges)/(the distance between the charges), the only thing fixed is the product of the charges. The EMF and (the distance between the charges) will have to balance out.
So...how this balancing act happens?

Thanks for your help.
 
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1. How does the distance between particles affect the strength of EMF?

The strength of the electromagnetic force (EMF) between particles decreases as the distance between them increases. This is because the force between particles is inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. In other words, the farther apart the particles are, the weaker the EMF between them.

2. Is there a specific distance at which the EMF between particles becomes negligible?

There is no specific distance at which the EMF between particles becomes negligible. However, as the distance between particles increases, the EMF becomes weaker and eventually becomes too weak to have a significant effect on the particles. This distance varies depending on the strength of the particles' charges and their masses.

3. Can EMF between particles exist at infinite distances?

No, the EMF between particles cannot exist at infinite distances. This is because the force between particles is caused by the exchange of virtual particles, which have a limited range of interaction. As the distance between particles increases, the virtual particles become too spread out to have a significant effect, resulting in a negligible EMF.

4. How does the distance between particles affect the direction of the EMF?

The direction of the EMF between particles is always along the line connecting them. As the distance between particles increases, the direction of the EMF remains the same but the strength of the force decreases. This means that the particles will still be attracted or repelled by each other, but with a weaker force.

5. Can the distance between particles affect the type of EMF that is produced?

Yes, the distance between particles can affect the type of EMF that is produced. For example, if the distance between particles is small enough, the EMF may be strong enough to overcome the particles' repulsive forces and cause them to attract each other, resulting in the formation of a covalent bond. On the other hand, if the distance between particles is large, the EMF may not be strong enough to overcome their repulsive forces, resulting in the particles remaining as separate entities.

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