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Rotating transparent object with stars - what was it?

  1. Jan 21, 2009 #1
    I witnessed a rather incredible aerial phenomenon years ago with naked eyes. It was around 2:00AM and a very clear night. As I was talking with someone, I caught something out of the corner of my eye above while I was talking with someone. It was cylindrical-shaped (although the ends seemed to just taper off) , rotating, transparent and appeared football fields in size. It moved overhead from behind and took up my entire peripheral vision. It had what appeared to be stars attached to it's perimeter, rotating with the "object". The stars were not in any particular order, but appeared evenly spaced. It made no sound and appeared as if a piece of the night sky had been cut out and was traveling overhead. One other person saw the tail end of it with me.

    I created an animated PowerPoint slide of the "object". It lacks the rotating movement the object had, but otherwise is a very good representation of what I witnessed. I have researched space phenomenon quite a bit since. Wormholes have recently caught my attention more and seem to bear the closest theoretical description to what I saw. I imagine, however, it would be impossible to see a wormhole with the naked eye though no matter how close to earth it was, correct?
     
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  3. Jan 21, 2009 #2
  4. Jan 21, 2009 #3

    LURCH

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    Could have been a blimp with a message displaying on the sides. When viewed from the wrong angle, these messages are impossible to read, and appear as randomly-placed lights scrolling along the skin of the airship.
     
  5. Jan 21, 2009 #4

    Chronos

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    Perception is a cruel mistress. Our brains are packed with imaginary perceptions that can superimpose themselves upon our sensory systems. Such impressions can be extremely powerful, despite disconnects with other senses [like objects moving at unbelievable visual speeds that make no sound]. I am very suspicious of such experiences. Visual illusions are particularly deceptive because our brains are so hard wired to believe what we 'see'. If you woke up to the smell of baking bread, but, found no loaves in the oven, would you believe your nose, or dismiss it as illusory?
     
  6. Jan 22, 2009 #5
    "Could have been a blimp with a message displaying on the sides. When viewed from the wrong angle, these messages are impossible to read, and appear as randomly-placed lights scrolling along the skin of the airship."

    But would that still explain how I was able to see right through it? It was completely transparent. I could see the stationary stars/sky behind it as it passed over. Also, I mentioned I had witnessed this with one other person, but upon reporting it to one of the national UFO reporting centers (which wasn't for months later) via phone the guy thanked me profusely for reporting it because I was the final "leg" of it's sightings that had started in CA and been witnessed by numerous others earlier in the week.

    "Perception is a cruel mistress. Our brains are packed with imaginary perceptions that can superimpose themselves upon our sensory systems. Such impressions can be extremely powerful, despite disconnects with other senses [like objects moving at unbelievable visual speeds that make no sound]. I am very suspicious of such experiences. Visual illusions are particularly deceptive because our brains are so hard wired to believe what we 'see'. If you woke up to the smell of baking bread, but, found no loaves in the oven, would you believe your nose, or dismiss it as illusory?"

    I understand your skepticism.. believe me, I really do. I contacted several professors about a year later thinking they would have a very simple explanation for what I saw... but they had no idea.

    I wish I had initially posed the question here simply as: What space phenomenon, theoretically speaking, would a rotating cylindrical-shaped transparent mass that contains within stars be categorized as?
     
  7. Jan 22, 2009 #6
  8. Jan 22, 2009 #7
    I think that this post is meant to another forum.
    But the most simpler answer that occurs to your question :"What space phenomenon, theoretically speaking, would a rotating cylindrical-shaped transparent mass that contains within stars be categorized as? "
    I would characterized him as a genuine 'contrail' illuminated in altitude by the Sun or Full Moon.
     
  9. Jan 22, 2009 #8
    I highly doubt a contrail.

    Anyway... could someone please answer my question about wormholes I initially asked? How close could one come to earth without disturbing the atmosphere.... would it be possible to see one with the naked eye?
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2009
  10. Jan 22, 2009 #9

    Jonathan Scott

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    Could it be a partially-deflated balloon made of thin transparent material, or reflective material like mylar?
     
  11. Jan 22, 2009 #10
    Balloon.... the thing appeared enormous. The "stars" on it were the same size as regular stars and therefore the object appeared the same distance away. It appeared this size if I had been on the ground in this pic: http://standeyo.com/index_images/CC_BIG_SAUCER.jpg

    If it had been a blimp, it was very close, although no noise at all.
     
  12. Jan 22, 2009 #11

    Jonathan Scott

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    As far as I know, there is no current standard theory which gives rise to wormholes so there is no obvious way to describe their properties outside science fiction.

    If they were associated in some way with a form of matter (not currently known to exist) which could bend space backwards, then the gravitational effects involved would presumably be of similar magnitude to those in black holes, and involve extreme energies.
     
  13. Jan 22, 2009 #12

    Thanks Jonathan... as I suspected.
     
  14. Jan 22, 2009 #13

    Jonathan Scott

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    It's very difficult to judge distances without familiar references. For example, walking in the open at night you may find something that looks like a silhouette of a large building on the horizon may suddenly resolve into a bench a few yards away. Reflections of lights could look like stars, especially if it was creased a bit underneath so as to create smaller reflections which would move with the creases. Experimental balloons (both tethered and free-flying) are sometimes made of large amounts of transparent or reflective material.

    Any UFO seen anywhere within 1000 miles of a student is always a bit suspicious! If you use two large circles of plastic film joined at the edge to create a nice saucer shape, fix some reflective sequins or similar round the edge, and fly it like a kite using black thread, it should create some entertainment for the neighbours.
     
  15. Jan 23, 2009 #14

    Chronos

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    My point was that human perception is fragile. I only suggested one category of explanations among many possibles.
     
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