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Should i continue my EE education or just work? or both?

  1. Feb 25, 2013 #1
    Hi, I enrolled into a 4-years Electrical engineering program. And i am on my 2nd year, also looking for a coop/intern this summer? Just out of curiosity, should i get like a Master or PhD on my field of study or work after i finished the 4-years program? Please give me advice! Thank You!!!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 25, 2013 #2
    It might help if you set some goals to pursue after you graduate. A Masters degree in Electrical Engineering might be interesting. It is also helpful to consider a slightly related field, such as Aeronautics, or perhaps embedded software design.

    On the other hand, a BSEE is highly marketable and you may find that you have plenty of opportunity with just that. It depends upon what kind of work you seek.

    I won't speak about a PhD because, honestly, I rarely see them in the field of electrical engineering, and where I do, it is usually in an academic setting. If that is what you seek, go for it.
     
  4. Feb 26, 2013 #3
    Thank you very much on the advice you gave me! By the way, I am looking for a job(intern/coop) this summer. What can i do to get the job? (I mean what i should do or should not do about interview and stuff, and i am very nervous.)
     
  5. Feb 26, 2013 #4
    When we have discussed interns, we generally try to find work that doesn't put them in dangerous environments, yet exposes them to some of our daily life. We're trying to attract students our company. We know they're not likely to remain with the company, but we'll try anyhow in the hopes that one in 20 might actually like what is going on and stick around.

    Interns need to understand that even if one is very experienced, they still don't know where things are, who manages them, or what standards of maintenance we use. It takes at least a year of work before we'll leave someone with years of experience to work independently. With a fresh graduate, it can take about two or even three years before they're technically up to speed and running with the pack. As such, we're not going to give an intern that kind of work. There are many hazards and dangers. I know some very conscientious and careful people who have been maimed or killed on the job.

    Please don't be offended, but we can't just drop an intern on a plant and give them a really important project to complete right away. There are subtle hazards to catch the unwary; political negotiations that need to be made, such that even a fresh graduate and permanent employee can not be reasonably expected to know.

    So interns get the routine work: telemetry configuration, and documentation, syslog review, backups, and the like. And while we're at it, we'll introduce them to various people around the plants and distribution system. There are many people to know.

    As an intern, you would do best to take an interest in what is going on around you, even if you're not working on it. Ask questions without being too nosy. Try to focus on getting your work done in a timely fashion. Be on time every time, and if you can't make it, call. Above all, if you screw up CONFESS right then. We all make mistakes. Nobody will get upset, particularly at an intern. But if you try to hide malfeasance of some sort, there will be fury the likes you have never seen. We all have each others back in this company. We depend on each other to stay safe. We have to trust each other. Don't betray that trust.

    That's what interns see when they come to our little group in the company. I don't know what it is like in other places. But that may give you some idea of what to expect...
     
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