Should I do an M.Sc. or M.Eng. after B.Sc. in chem?

  • Thread starter laneway
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In summary, the conversation discusses the potential benefits and differences between obtaining a B. Eng., M. Eng., M. Sc., M. A. Sc., M. Eng. in chemical engineering, and an M. Sc. plus MBA. The individual is currently studying for a honors degree in chemistry, but is considering transitioning to a career in sustainability, specifically water purification/recycling. They seek advice on whether obtaining a master's in engineering is necessary for employment in this field and whether PE certification is important. It is mentioned that there may be potential changes in certification requirements in the future.
  • #1
laneway
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If you don't have a B. Eng. (and are not a certified engineer):

Does it make sense to do an M. Eng.?

What is the difference between the kind of jobs you can get with an M. Sc. in chemistry, and an M. A. Sc. or M. Eng. in chemical engineering?

What about an M. Sc. plus MBA?

I am one year away from graduating with an honors chem degree. As my next research internship approaches, I am starting to realize that academia might not be the right place for me long-term. My interests are in sustainability, particularly water purification/recycling. Please forgive my vagueness. I am just beginning to explore what my interests are and how I can transition to a different career path. Any comments are appreciated.
 
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  • #2
i am to am interested in your question, does anyone have any advice
 
  • #3
It's certainly still possible to get employment in engineering with a science degree followed by a master's in engineering, and without PE certification (at least in the US.). If I were you, I'd look into job requirements for current openings in your particular field of interest, since you already have this narrowed down. That way you can perhaps feel out how important PE certification is in the field (look at higher-level positions in the field for this).

As an aside, I've seen some publication that says they are considering individuals with a science degrees and 30 hours of master's level work in engineering qualify for PE testing and certification, but what I've read is that this won't happen until 2010 or 2012 at the earliest. (Too late for me... but maybe perfect timing for you!) Of course, as far as I know, this is still in the discussion stages, so I wouldn't put all my eggs in this basket counting on it.
 

1. Should I choose an M.Sc. or M.Eng. after completing my B.Sc. in Chemistry?

This is a common question among students who are pursuing a Bachelor's degree in Chemistry. Ultimately, the decision should be based on your career goals and personal interests. An M.Sc. (Master of Science) is a research-oriented program that focuses on developing advanced knowledge and skills in a specific area of chemistry. On the other hand, an M.Eng. (Master of Engineering) is a professional degree that combines technical and management skills for a career in industry. Consider your long-term career plans and the type of work you see yourself doing in the future to determine which program is the best fit for you.

2. What are the differences in curriculum between an M.Sc. and M.Eng. in Chemistry?

The curriculum for an M.Sc. in Chemistry typically includes advanced coursework in chemistry and research project or thesis. This program is designed to prepare students for careers in research and academia. In contrast, an M.Eng. in Chemistry may have a more practical approach with coursework in engineering principles, project management, and internships. This program is geared towards preparing students for careers in industry as engineers or project managers.

3. Are there specific job opportunities for graduates of an M.Sc. or M.Eng. in Chemistry?

Both an M.Sc. and M.Eng. in Chemistry can lead to a variety of job opportunities. Graduates of an M.Sc. may find employment in research and development, quality control, or teaching positions in academia. Graduates of an M.Eng. may find employment as chemical engineers, environmental engineers, or project managers in industries such as pharmaceuticals, energy, or manufacturing. It is important to research the job market and potential employers in your area to determine which degree may be more beneficial for your desired career path.

4. Is one degree more valuable than the other in terms of salary or career growth?

The value of a degree depends on many factors, including your skills, experience, and the job market. In general, an M.Sc. may lead to a higher salary and more opportunities for career growth in research and academia. An M.Eng. may lead to a higher salary in certain industries, such as engineering and project management. However, both degrees can lead to successful and fulfilling careers, and it is important to choose the program that aligns with your career goals and interests.

5. Can I switch from an M.Sc. to an M.Eng. program or vice versa?

It is possible to switch between M.Sc. and M.Eng. programs, but it may require additional coursework or a change in research focus. It is important to carefully consider your decision and seek guidance from your academic advisor before making a switch. Additionally, some universities may have specific requirements for switching between programs, so it is important to research the policies of your desired program before making a decision.

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