Simple Supported Beams: Deflection at Supports?

In summary, the definition of a "support" in a simply-supported beam bending problem is zero deflection, unless the ground support gives or the support structure is crushed by weight. If flexibility is a significant aspect, it can be modeled as a spring but this can complicate problems and is typically avoided.
  • #1
jnlbctln
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If i have a simple suppoted beam, let's say for example 2 supports with overhanging loads at end and/or midspan. DOES IT ALWAYS HAVE zero deflection at the support? or are there times that there is deflection at those supports? :confused:
 
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  • #2
The definition of a "support" in a simply-supported beam bending problem is zero deflection.
 
  • #3
Thanks! :D
 
  • #4
jnlbctln said:
If i have a simple suppoted beam, let's say for example 2 supports with overhanging loads at end and/or midspan. DOES IT ALWAYS HAVE zero deflection at the support? or are there times that there is deflection at those supports? :confused:

Two things come to mind: 1) if the ground support for the supports give or 2) if the support structure gets somewhat crushed by the weight. Other than that, you assume the support structure does not give.
 
  • #5
By definition, a support is assumed to be rigid unless something else is said about it. In reality, we know that nothing is truly rigid, and if you think support flexibility is a significant aspect of your problem, you should model the support as a spring (possibly non-linear, if you want to get fancy) to take flexibility into account. This usually complicates problems significantly, and is usually avoided if at all possible.
 

Related to Simple Supported Beams: Deflection at Supports?

1. What is a simple supported beam?

A simple supported beam is a type of structural element that is supported at two points, usually at the ends, and is free to rotate and deflect under load.

2. What is deflection at supports?

Deflection at supports is the amount of vertical displacement or movement at the points where the beam is supported, due to the applied load. It is also known as vertical displacement or vertical deflection.

3. How is deflection at supports calculated?

The deflection at supports can be calculated using various methods, such as the double integration method, the moment area method, or the virtual work method. The exact method used will depend on the complexity of the beam and the type of load applied.

4. What factors affect the deflection at supports?

The deflection at supports is affected by several factors, including the material properties of the beam, the magnitude and distribution of the applied load, and the distance between the supports. The type of support conditions, such as pinned or fixed, also play a role in determining the deflection at supports.

5. Why is it important to calculate deflection at supports?

Calculating the deflection at supports is important in determining the structural integrity and safety of a beam. Excessive deflection can cause the beam to fail or become unstable, leading to potential hazards and structural damage. It is also important for engineers and designers to ensure that the beam can withstand the expected load and meet the required design criteria.

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