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Smartphones and radiation health effects

  1. Dec 5, 2018 #1
    Is it just me or lately there is a big fuss about this? I keep running into news of a recent study that has found smartphones may induce cancer on rats and so on...

    Did they really find something relevant or is it just the same old story?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 5, 2018 #2

    fresh_42

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    As long as you cannot name a peer reviewed study, aka publication, it is the same old story. The comparisons with mice and rats often fail to respect the difference in magnitudes. If rodents are exposed to anything in extreme overdoses, cancer is almost a natural consequence.

    Please name a publication which we can discuss, for otherwise this thread will be doomed to pure speculation.
    Send me an appropriate link of such a study per PM. Until then this thread will be closed.
     
  4. Dec 6, 2018 #3

    fresh_42

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    https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jeph/2018/7910754/
    Brain Tumours: Rise in Glioblastoma Multiforme Incidence in England 1995–2015 Suggests an Adverse Environmental or Lifestyle Factor

    Alasdair Philips, Denis L. Henshaw, Graham Lamburn, Michael J.O’Carroll

     
  5. Dec 6, 2018 #4

    jrmichler

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    My own opinion is that cell phone cancer will be shown to be the same as high voltage power line cancer. There was a scare about electromagnetic fields from high voltage power lines causing cancer back in the 1980's. The initial scare was, I believe, caused by a study that showed increased risk of cancer in people living near high voltage power lines. Then, somebody realized that people living near high voltage power lines tended to be from lower income groups that had higher rates of cancer due to lifestyle factors. That lead to further studies.

    A good summary of the power line electromagnetic cancer scare situation is at: http://large.stanford.edu/publications/crime/references/moulder/moulder.pdf. If you look at the plots on pages 12, 18, 19, 23, 24, and 33, the argument can be made that about half of the studies show that electromagnetic fields decrease cancer.

    It is known that a significant portion of cancers are related to lifestyle. Here is one reference: https://journals.lww.com/journalppo/Abstract/2015/03000/Lifestyle_and_Cancer_Risk.9.aspx. Before linking cell phones to cancer, it is necessary to rigorously compare the lifestyles of heavy cell phone users to non cell phone users. Good search terms for more information: lifestyle cancer risk.
     
  6. Dec 6, 2018 #5

    Evo

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    Thanks fresh for posting the study the OP sent you that you requested.

    That study only had one blurb near the bottom referring to two other studies about cell phones. I searched on the studies and found this paper on them.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4690283/
     
  7. Dec 6, 2018 #6
    I didn't. I was actually asking for some articles about it so thank you all very much.

    From what I've read it seems there is no evident connection. I'll keep searching though when I have time.

    thanks again
     
  8. Dec 6, 2018 #7

    fresh_42

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    Well, in a way you did. Your pop science article you sent me led to another pop science article in a British newspaper which fortunately has linked its source. So "smart phones cause cancer" was a result of the cited study, although the study doesn't say so. Another example, how scientific work is abused just to get a catchy (and cheap!) headliner.
    I wouldn't, for exactly that reason: Starting at a headline and then digging out the source usually (> 99%) won't leave much of said headline!
     
  9. Dec 6, 2018 #8

    BWV

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    And where can you find non cellphone users these days?


    Interestingly the 5.0 ASR per 100K for the UK is will above the US:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK470003/
     
  10. Dec 6, 2018 #9
    That is absolutelty right. Sometimes I forget what theese websites are all about.

    But you would not believe how many articles of this kind I ran into during the last month... It was like everyday. So, even through I'm very skeptical about this stuff, I began to wonder.
     
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