So I want to learn a martial art.

  • Thread starter G01
  • Start date
  • #51
Astronuc
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
18,819
1,999
Didn't you mention bars a hot spot for fights? Friends and I go all the time, and we never seen a fight break out yet. What bars have you been going to? We go to busiest bars in the region, which means we actually drive out of town to a bar that normally has 1000-2500 people in it.
It depends on the bar, and the part of town or people. Growing up in Houston, every Friday and Saturday night, there was someone shot or stabbed in a bar - I kid you not.

One of my friends got beat up pretty badly in a bar. He and two other friends were in a joint getting some drinks. A group came into the bar and let my friends know that they were not welcome (it was 7 or so against 3). A fight broke out and my friend ended up getting smacked over the head with a pool cue. He was a bloody mess when he came by - and he had a torn scalp (another frined took him to the hospital for stitches) and lump on his skull.
 
  • #52
mathwonk
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
10,934
1,091
i think the point i would like to make is: martial arts are a sport, fighting is not. do not get in fights just because you are a trained martial artist. someone may still take a piece out of you. those of us who are older have lost friends this way, and alcohol was frequently involved.

even if it only happens once out of a hundred, if its your friend, you never forget.
 
Last edited:
  • #53
Pythagorean
Gold Member
4,193
256
In my hometown bars, there are generally fights every weekend (Fishing town on an island in Alaska... go figure).

I've never gotten hurt once though, because it takes two cocky sobs to start a fight in a bar. We had an excellent bartender too, who had a clever technique:

"nobody in here gets a drink until he leaves."

Then everyone looks at the trouble-maker and he leaves without resistance.
 
  • #54
G01
Homework Helper
Gold Member
2,665
16
In my hometown bars, there are generally fights every weekend (Fishing town on an island in Alaska... go figure).

I've never gotten hurt once though, because it takes two cocky sobs to start a fight in a bar. We had an excellent bartender too, who had a clever technique:

"nobody in here gets a drink until he leaves."

Then everyone looks at the trouble-maker and he leaves without resistance.
Haha. Thats a smart plan!
 
  • #55
JasonRox
Homework Helper
Gold Member
2,314
3
i think the point i would like to make is: martial arts are a sport, fighting is not. do not get in fights just because you are a trained martial artist. someone may still take a piece out of you. those of us who are older have lost friends this way, and alcohol was frequently involved.

even if it only happens once out of a hundred, if its your friend, you never forget.
Martial Artists tend to never start fights. If they do, they may and will probably lose their right to train Martial Arts. Therefore, if you're a martial artist and someone picks a fight with you, you're pretty much 99% sure the other guy has no training in martial arts.

People say street fighting is dirty... well it is. But then again, MMA gets even dirtier. So, I'd always bet on the MMA guy to win.
 
  • #56
356
3
I've found jujitsu to be useful, actually. Not in fights, but there are a lot of times, especially when your young and loud like me, that individual attacks are thrown against you with no intention for prologued combat. Having practiced blocking, I actually surprised myself in these situations how easily I reacted, and properly.
 
  • #57
1,490
22
Martial Artists tend to never start fights. If they do, they may and will probably lose their right to train Martial Arts.
Depending on your level, it can be considered a deadly weapon. My teacher, a former police officer, told us even our stance was designed to appear defensive in nature. The style called for you to step back with one foot, and put your weight to the back or centered. This did a couple of things, gave the appearance of moving away from the fight and freed your front foot for a snap kick.

If you did use the kick and break the guy's kneecap, any witnesses could say you were not the aggressor and attempted to back away from the fight.
 
  • #58
DaveC426913
Gold Member
18,786
2,268
Actually, this is a very helpful thread for me. I have been toying with the idea of learning a bit of Martial Arts. But at my age and fitness, I shouldn't make such a decision lightly.

I've never actually been in a fist fight - even as a kid. But in this day and age, I think it's inevitable that at some point, I'll be face-to-face with someone in a very heated altercation in a parking lot or movie theatre. Last time that happened the adrenaline had me shaking like a leaf.

I'd like to gain enough confidence that I can at least stand my grond and not buckle (and that may be merely matter of exiting the situation with a bit of grace).

I was thinking that just the act of learning a little MA would allow me react with better timing, instead of just standing there dumbly.
 
  • #59
2,985
15
He who walks away lives to see another day.
 
  • #60
459
7
I prefer, "I don't have to run fast. I just have to run faster than you".
 
  • #61
radou
Homework Helper
3,115
6
He who walks away lives to see another day.
True, but now you're into poetry or what? :tongue:
 
  • #62
Pythagorean
Gold Member
4,193
256
I prefer, "I don't have to run fast. I just have to run faster than you".
During bear season, the guy that can kick the other guy's knee in first wins.
 
  • #63
459
7
During bear season, the guy that can kick the other guy's knee in first wins.
I think you've discovered the only reason to use martial arts for violence.
 
  • #64
Pythagorean
Gold Member
4,193
256
I think you've discovered the only reason to use martial arts for violence.
there's a couple discripencies too:

if you have a small round that doesn't do very much damage, you can shoot your friend in the kneecap (since it will be useless against the bear) therefore circumventing years of martial arts training.

If you have a big gun, you might as well shoot the bear and save your friend.
 
  • #65
G01
Homework Helper
Gold Member
2,665
16
During bear season, the guy that can kick the other guy's knee in first wins.
:rofl::rofl:
 
  • #66
dlgoff
Science Advisor
Gold Member
3,823
1,756
Actually, this is a very helpful thread for me. I have been toying with the idea of learning a bit of Martial Arts. But at my age and fitness, I shouldn't make such a decision lightly.
One gentleman in my daughters school had a goal of becoming a black belt before he turned 70yo. Well he didn't get his black belt, but he was very close with a 1st degree brown.

So; go for it :approve:
 
  • #67
DaveC426913
Gold Member
18,786
2,268
One gentleman in my daughters school had a goal of becoming a black belt before he turned 70yo. Well he didn't get his black belt, but he was very close with a 1st degree brown.

So; go for it :approve:
Well, I don't really want to learn it for its own sake, I just want to be able to defend myself.
 
  • #68
radou
Homework Helper
3,115
6
I think I'm going to put up thai boxing during the summer break. Looks attractive.
 
  • #69
dlgoff
Science Advisor
Gold Member
3,823
1,756
Well, I don't really want to learn it for its own sake, I just want to be able to defend myself.
Then http://www.kravmaga.com/krav01.html" [Broken].
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #70
Astronuc
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
18,819
1,999
Those scenes on the KravMaga site (IIRC, practice of IDF) are similar to those that I have done in Tae Kwon Do and Shaolin Kempo, and seen in Muay Thai.

Pick a school, and make sure it is a good school, and stick with it. One could also do a limited self-defense course.

Part of the training is stretching, endurance training (cardio workout), weight training, and speed training. If starting out in middle age, ease into it in order to avoid injury, and consider a cardiac stress test.
 
  • #71
devil-fire
i think the point i would like to make is: martial arts are a sport, fighting is not. do not get in fights just because you are a trained martial artist. someone may still take a piece out of you. those of us who are older have lost friends this way, and alcohol was frequently involved.

even if it only happens once out of a hundred, if its your friend, you never forget.
this is good advice. unless you know the person your fighting against (aka not running away from), the person could be crazy. they could have a knife, a gun, friends near by who dont care about a 'fair fight', the person might chomp a finger or ear off, or want to mutilate you if you get knocked out by chance.

sparring can be quite fun though
 
  • #72
FeloniousMonk
Not a physics student, Googling and thought I'd butt in.

Don't worry as much about finding a superior art as finding a superior teacher in any art. Any MA training will start you on the road, but there's a difference between teachers who see your MA potential and teachers who see you for your income potential.

Your plain boring old YMCA judo class is a great place to start, and very inexpensively, too. But you won't be bored for long. Grappling with well matched ukes is as complete an exercise program as there is. You won't need to lift weights, and you won't need to run. You'll just need to recover, lol. You will see big gains in strength and endurance early on. If he has a Kodokan lineage he likely has a lot of striking and kicking techniques in his program.

My first MA class was in 1976 when I walked into a Kenpo Karate class in Florida. I took it to second degree black, and it's a very excellent, holistic style, circular and powerful. I wanted more, but I wasn't sure what. Then I got exposed to tiger kung fu styles like hark fu kuen and hei hu quan...not for everyone, but for me, took everything to a different level. Brings out the animal in you...and that's not the half of it...

Some people like things more linear, more science and logic dictating response rather than art and intangibles, more cut-to-the-chase, for them Shotokan and Goju are strong styles. Kyokushinkai is a rough style and it's a no joke fighter's style...it's founder, Mas Oyama, killed young bulls with bare hands...I think there are old 50's B&W footage of some of his unarmed bullfights on YouTube...

I'd say get into judo, get physically fit, talk to the judo instructor, he's probably knowedgable as to the MA classes in your area. Be very frank as to what you're looking for. Just like in college you can sit in on a class, check out some MA teachers and sit in on their classes.

Good luck...the closest I ever got to studying physics was watching Carl Sagan's COSMOS a loooong time ago...before I got all these grey hairs. I didn't understand half of it, but it didn't stop me from watching it fifty times.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #73
1,707
5
do mma, it's the only thing that will truly prepare you for a streetfight.
 
  • #74
809
0
It really comes down to your instructor.

Find someone who has a heavy background getting into real fights. If you can find a good instructor in the Bujinkan, then you will have everything you need. Unfortunately, there are a TON of ****ty instructors who will teach you magic, and they do not have any practical experience. However, there are some excellent instructors, that teach you how to use weapons from day one. They teach you survival, not fighting techniques.

Most Karate, Taekwondo, Mua Tai, etc... schools are SPORT. They have NOTHING to do with defending yourself. A lot of MMA schools are the same, but they will prepare you A LOT more than most other schools. However, as Cyrus pointed out, a weapon changes the game.

If you really want to learn to protect yourself, get a concealed weapons permit. If you cannot or do not want to do this, look into Knife fighting. Someone skilled in using a Knife will win against anyone not skilled in using a gun.

Like someone pointed out, getting yourself into Boxing will let you knock out most Joe Blows. However, there are people out there who can really take punches, and who are just plain stronger than you. This is where intelligent fighting is important. This is where non-sport fighting is important.

Shop around at different schools. Find an instructor who has a no nonsense approach to their art. Someone with a strong military background, or maybe a bouncer is a good candidate.

Systema is another interesting art, however, there are some nutballs teaching it. Probably your safest bet for getting in shape is boxing. Your safest bet for taking on most Joe Blows is MMA (don't get too cocky though). For survival, it comes down to gun or knife - be prepared for serious serious jail offense here though (actually most non-sport arts can land you in jail). Mua Tai, Bujinkan (IF! you have a good instructor - big, big, big IF here) are also good arts. Watch out for Krav Maga... I've seen so many money hungry shops, that teach **** self defense.

Find someone who doesn't make you sign a contract! Find someone who cares about their art, and is NOT corporate like so many hack ass Karate schools (these are probably what Cyrus is thinking of). Find a school who deals with weapons. There is a lot to consider. So consider it.
 
  • #75
809
0
do mma, it's the only thing that will truly prepare you for a streetfight.
Bull ****.

There is no ONLY thing. Each art has a weakness, and a strength.
 

Related Threads on So I want to learn a martial art.

  • Last Post
6
Replies
144
Views
15K
  • Last Post
Replies
15
Views
4K
  • Last Post
3
Replies
67
Views
15K
Replies
12
Views
10K
Replies
13
Views
2K
Replies
71
Views
9K
  • Last Post
Replies
9
Views
8K
  • Last Post
2
Replies
36
Views
4K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
4K
  • Last Post
Replies
10
Views
2K
Top