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So which engineering course is the hardest?

  1. May 29, 2013 #1
    So I am currently at my Year 1 Semester 1 of my Mechanical Engineering Degree in Malaysia and what I heard the most from my lecturers during my 1st class "introduction" is that Mechanical Engineering is the hardest after Aeronautical Engineering and advise us to change course to other engineering if we are not prepare for it.

    So based on ur personal advice, should i change to other Engineering or stay with Mechanical?

    >I kinda love physic :tongue: but not quite good in maths :cry:
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 29, 2013 #2
    It's difficult but not unbearable. Any engineering will be difficult, don't think for a minute if you switch that you're going to have it any easier. Lets say you go to civil engineering, guess what? You still get to take statics, strength of materials, dynamics, thermodynamics, fluid dynamics and heat transfer. Lets say you go to electrical, you still have to take a lot of math and physics courses, on top of your electrical engineering courses which are more conceptual and they aren't easy courses frankly. There's no easy engineering major, so if you're considering switching majors because you think mechanical engineering is too hard you should just do something else besides engineering.
     
  4. May 29, 2013 #3
    hmmm.... but are engineering maths harder then pure maths subjects?
     
  5. May 29, 2013 #4
    The hardest engineering specialization IMO is the one that bores you to tears. I'm no expert, but plain old interest is a powerful motivator. You'll strive harder through a lot more maths if you care about the outcome. Speaking of which, what exactly do you hope to do?
     
  6. May 30, 2013 #5
    The math courses are the same. Math majors take calculus 1-3, differential equations, linear algebra and applied math ( partial differential equations, Fourier Analysis,etc) at my school and as a nuclear engineering student I had to take them as well. Stop worrying about the math you'll get better and better with it as you advance in your degree.
     
  7. May 30, 2013 #6
    I wouldn't worry about which is harder. Both require a heavy math load so if you are worried about the math load you should honestly think about another major. Math is to an engineering major as English is to a literature major in North America.

    I do not want to sound mean, but I could not imagine getting into engineering without a love, or at least a mild enjoyment, of using mathematics to solve real world problems.
     
  8. May 30, 2013 #7
    There's no engineering major that's the hardest, it's all relative. But seriously EE is the hardest because it's my major.
     
  9. May 31, 2013 #8
    They are about equal to what I did in the second year of my math degree. In fact I did an engineering math subject that covered grad/div/curl, fourier transforms etc.

    In my 3rd year of the math degree there was complex and real analysis, Banach spaces etc. Engineers don't need that - unless they are working on quantum mechanics etc.
     
  10. May 31, 2013 #9
    well, i will try to cope with it i guess, I reali wanted to be an engineer though its hard
     
  11. May 31, 2013 #10
    Engineering school is hard, yes, but the end result is generally worth the struggle.
     
  12. Jun 7, 2013 #11
    worth.... what CGPA should i target coz 3.5 is quite hard i guess? abv 3.0 is good?
     
  13. Jun 7, 2013 #12
    well ,I think Electrical engineering is harder and many people go into Mechanical because it is easier.
    anyway,if you are looking for an easy major then switch into something else like Accounting (it is not that easy too).

    get your balls together and take the freshman year and see what happens.
     
  14. Jun 7, 2013 #13
    Well, if you have a 3.0 you qualify for the bare minimum of entry into some masters programs.

    I'm trying to aim for a 3.5 so I will not have issues getting into a MS Nuclear Engineering program. You should just aim for the best you can get! Who knows, maybe you will land a 3.2 to 3.5!
     
  15. Jun 8, 2013 #14
    haha i will try =D

    anyway until now...i not sure what mechanical eng grad work.. unlike civil the deal with anything related to bulildings, E&E obviously electronics.... but mechanical...Machines??? :confused:
     
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