Solve following problems by using energy conservation theory

In summary, we can use energy conservation theory to solve the following problems: a car driving down a long hill with the engine off and constant speed, a cyclist slowing up a slope with a given slope angle and total resistance to motion, and a small ball in a circular flow with constant friction. For the first problem, with a car mass of 1020 kg and a hill drop of 1.00 m per 25.0 m driven, we can calculate the total friction on the car. For the second problem, with a cyclist and bicycle mass of 81.5 kg and a slope length of 16 m, we can calculate the traction force of the bike. And for the third problem, with an initial speed of
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Solve following problems by using energy conservation theory..

A car driving down a long hill. The engine is switched off, and the speed is constant. The hill has a drop of 1.00 m for each 25.0 m driven way. The car has mass 1020 kg. Calculate the total friction on the car.

A cyclist slows from 4.5 m / s to 2.5 m / s up a 16 m long slope with slope angle 4.3 ˚. The cyclist and the bicycle has a total mass of 81.5 kg. The total resistance to motion is 11 N. Calculate the traction force of the bike.

A small ball is set in motion with initial speed 1.0 m / s in a horizontal circular flow of radius 19 cm. The friction of the bullet is constantly 0.50% of the weight. How many rounds rolling ball take before it stops?


I have attempted but I am not sure where to start.Kindly help!
 
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  • #2
So, post what you have thought on the first problem! :smile:
 

1. How does energy conservation theory work?

Energy conservation theory is based on the law of conservation of energy, which states that energy cannot be created or destroyed, only transformed from one form to another. This means that the total amount of energy in a closed system remains constant over time. In practical terms, this means that energy can be transferred from one object to another, but the total amount of energy in the system will always remain the same.

2. What are some examples of energy conservation in action?

There are many examples of energy conservation in everyday life. For instance, when a ball is thrown into the air, it gains potential energy as it rises and loses kinetic energy as it slows down. When it falls back to the ground, the potential energy is transformed back into kinetic energy. Another example is a pendulum, where kinetic energy is continuously converted into potential energy and back again.

3. How can energy conservation theory be applied to solve problems?

Energy conservation theory can be applied to solve problems by using the principle that the total energy in a closed system remains constant. This means that when solving a problem, you can equate the initial energy of the system to the final energy, taking into account any energy transformations that may occur. By setting up and solving equations, you can determine unknown variables such as the final velocity or height of an object.

4. What are some common misconceptions about energy conservation theory?

One common misconception about energy conservation theory is that it only applies to mechanical systems. In reality, energy conservation applies to all types of energy, including thermal, electrical, and chemical energy. Another misconception is that energy cannot be lost in a closed system. While the total amount of energy remains constant, energy can be transformed into forms that are not easily measured, such as sound or heat.

5. How does energy conservation theory impact our daily lives?

Energy conservation theory has a significant impact on our daily lives, as it is the basis for many technologies and practices that help us conserve energy and reduce waste. For example, understanding the principles of energy conservation can help us make more efficient use of energy in our homes, workplaces, and transportation. It also plays a crucial role in renewable energy sources and reducing our carbon footprint to combat climate change.

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